Posted: 10/1/2013 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 52 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

2013 EVSS Contest Results 

Thank you for participating in the East Villagers Service Scholar Essay & Art Contest. We received hundreds of submissions this year, many of which were inspiring and captivating. This made the evaluation process very difficult, but in the end, the finalists and winners were selected based on the writer/artist's clarity of expression, critical reflection, and mature analysis of themes and experiences related to community service. This year, we also decided to give out honorable mentions titles to applicants whose service experiences were particularly impressive or moving. Thank you for your patience for the long delay as we reviewed the entries.

Regardless of the results below, all of you should be proud of having pursued volunteerism and public service so early in your lives. Continue striving to use your talents and resources to address the various needs in our community, and as you gain new experiences and convictions, we invite you to apply again for this contest.

We thank the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation for their generous support and sponsorship. Winners from Northern California may be invited to read their essays or display their artworks at the annual Service Scholar Award Celebration hosted by the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation. It is now our great pleasure to announce the 2013 Winners, Finalists, and Honorable Mentions:
 
High School Essay
First Place ($500): Makenna Lenover (Allentown, PA)
Second Place ($350): Rebecca Schrader (Bryans Road, MD)
Third Place ($150): Katherine Head (Bloomington, IN)Rebecca Frankeberger (Chino Hills, CA), Hye Sung Kim (Tenafly, NJ)

Honorable Mentions: Irene Lam, Katie Townsend, Nataly Ulloa, James Wharton

Fine Art
Winner ($300): Vi Tran (Fort Smith, AR)
Runner Up ($200): Morgan Beckwith (Lake Havasu City, AZ)

Finalists: Maliha Abidi (San Diego, CA), Mariana Martinez (Anaheim, CA), Claire Gagnon (Warrenton, VA)

Honorable Mentions: Molly Ueland, Kimberly Jaimes-Azmitia, Katelyn Murray, Maria Ramirez
 
Digital Art
Winner ($300): Sarah Webb (Fairbanks, AK)
Runner Up ($200): Cadance Ries (Soldier, KS)

Finalists: Margaret Radl (Madison, WI), Olivia McCash (Matilda, PA), Tam Pham (San Jose, CA)

Honorable Mentions: Ela Chavarria, Brittany Coleman, Nicole Tsai, Molly Ueland

Middle School Essay
First Place ($250): Griffin Kaiser (Raleigh, NC)
Second Place ($150): Emily Kam (Burlingame, CA)
Third Place ($75): Stephanie Wallen (Waunakee, WI)
 
Remember that although the contest may be over, your journey as a public servant is not! As you continue to serve and grow, we invite you to share your stories with us on our website:http://www.eastvillagers.org/home.php. Also keep in touch with us on our facebook page:http://www.facebook.com/eastvillagers.  If you are in the area and would like to volunteer with us, please visit: http://www.servicescholar.com

 

Posted: 6/30/2010 - 10 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 610 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

Thank you for participating in the East Villagers Service Scholar Essay Contest! We really enjoyed reading every one of your essays and were truly inspired by your enthusiasm and passion for service. Your commitment to serving the community and making the world a better place is very commendable. We thank the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation for their generous support and sponsorship.  All winners will be interviewed by our EV Team in-person or via Skype and featured on the East Villagers Non-Profit News Home Page. Winners from Northern California will be invited to read their essays at the annual Service Scholar Award Celebration hosted by the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation.

It is our great pleasure to announce our 2010 Winners:

High School Service Scholars

First Place ($500 + EV T-Shirt): Brian Wong, Age 14 (Alameda, CA)

Second Place ($350 + EV T-Shirt): Subha Mohan, Age 17 (San Jose, CA) & Stephane Fouche (Spring Valley, NY)

Third Place ($150 + EV T-Shirt): April Sylvester, Age 18 ( Sywanee, GA) & Thy Vo, Age 18 (Anaheim, CA)

Runner Ups (Prize: EV T-Shirt):
William Bauer, Age 18 (Closter, NJ)
Grace Li, Age 14 (Manvel, Texas)
Jenny Combs, Age 16 (Alabaster, AL)
Verushka Soto, Age 16 (Moca, Puerto Rico)
Hurjane Vongsachang, Age 16 (San Marcos, CA)
Stewart Pence, Age 17 (Joplin, MO)
Max Wallack, Age 14 (Natick, MA)
Angela Hart, Age 17 (Reading, MA)
Leighton Bell, Age 18 (Metairie, LA)

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Middle School Service Scholars

First Place ($300 + EV T-Shirt): Sharon Li, Age 12 (Manvel, Texas)

Second Place ($200 + EV T-Shirt): Ashleigh Santaliz, Age 13 (Howard Beach, NY)

Third Place ($75 + EV T-Shirt): Zack Anderson, Age 13 (Renton, WA) & Breanna Berry, Age 13 (Clovis, CA)

Runner Ups (Prize: EV T-shirts):
Eric Li, Age 9 (Manvel, Texas)
Daniel Colina, Age 13 (Waco, Texas)
Justus Aarhus, Age 13 (Georgetown, Texas)

Please comment below or email us your size (adult S, M, L, XL) to claim your EV T-shirts. (eastvillagers@gmail.com)

Honorable Mention Service Scholars (Prize: 2000 points)

 

Joshua Caleb - Brazil Church Builder

Shanique Thomas - Sister has Cancer

Carolyn Walker - Shoeboxes for Homeless

Sabrina Schiermeyer - Cancer Patient

Chanapa Tantibanchachai - Tutor who had to deal with her own blood disorder 

Lauren Rohrs - Missionary to Louisiana and West Virginia

Tylyn Trummer - Service Trip to Uganda Africa to help school children and AIDS patients

Annika Mizel - Freed 12 slaves through her initiative in "Loose Change to Loosen Chains"

Linda Myrna Pachero - Mother has Cancer yet still perseveres to help tutor spanish and at local offices

Carrie Baum - Raised over $15,000 to build church and orphanage in India with best friend

Julie Tran - Painted chicago Asian American Mural in downtown chicago

Charles Allen Tillery - Initiated ongoing food collection and donates items to their community

Alexander Silady - Started ESL courses to benefit his community

Dane Austreng - Started Kelso Clean-Up to help beautify community -- 3 friends became hundreds of volunteers.

Esther Machibya - Community Altruism by working closely with Teen Court

Caroline Pledger - Father is blind, but has tons of initiatives and is a serial volunteer and organizer

Johanel Caceres - Youth Justice

Alan Li - Takes the initiative to do things, namely the optimist club at his school

Michelle Tan - Helps brother with disability and volunteers at St. Agnes Center

Kayla Davis - Has fiery attitude regarding lack of care in today's society. Works for human rights as well.

Colleen Tan - Realized a cultural disconnect between Chinese and Chinese-Born Americans regarding culture. Volunteers as English teacher in Nangken, China.

Eric Dice - Built benches and gardens to beautify his community

Chanelle D. Baker - Felt need to raise awareness for irresponsible drivers. Started "Stop Texting, Just Drive" initiative and Hats for Haiti.

Mary A. McIntosh - Teen Feed to help provide meals for homeless teens

Jessica Guthrie - Fought her personal demons and helped promote Relay for Life

Kayla Brock - has a HUGE heart for service in St. Louis, Alaska, Mexico, etc..

Jennifer Lysaythong - Tutors in Asia and America

Josefina Ruiz - Greatly serves the Hispanic community around her

Jasmine Pettaway - Has great insight into service work and the world while appreciating everything she has

Victoria Hwang - Brother has Down Syndrome, teaching her the importance of service and volunteerism

Chelsea Wallace - After helping research Celiac Disease, found out that she had the disease as well and the importance of raising awareness for Celiac Disease

Brandon Lucas -Missions in Mexico, Alaska, and in America

Jessica A. Jordan - Gained confidence through her initiative of a Blanket Donation project.

Kathleen LaRiviere - worked with Habitat for Humanity for over 9 years (since age of 13)

Cara Palmer - Absolutely fanatical about Water, teaching about its importance around the world

Colleen Kendall - Spiritual Volunteer at a Hospital

Alexis I. Foxx - Artist for childrens' stories and has a good sense of business initiative

Amy Hyman - Feminist Activist for Womens' rights

Amanda Dlugi - has tremendous work ethic and leadership experience

Heather Carmichael - After father passed away, she matured as a volunteer and citizen

Sara Argabright - Loves Nature and works at the Creative Learning Center Nature Exchange

Kevin Huynh - Embraced a variety of community service opportunities in his city

Ashley Howard - tireless social worker

Mackenzie Jacoby - Works in Brazil and shows a tremendous business mind because of it. Works with children in Central America and anywhere else she can help

Ayla Pelton-Cox - Serves a great deal despite family's financial disposition.

Jessica Barajas - Started Photovoice for Gangs and struggling minorities

Victoria Hurley - Camp NOVA for children with Seizures after her mom sparked her interest (she was current director)

Chelsea Lynne Sandmeyer - Changed a great deal due to selfless service. Worked everywhere from Bethea to Liberia

Cassandra Kay Howey - Persevered a great deal in her life and continues to help others through volunteer work around the world.

Donovan Westbrooks - His life is to serve. He can't live a day without it.

To claim your points, please comment below or email eastvillagers@gmail.com with your login email for East Villagers. Thank You.

 

Posted: 6/12/2010 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 58 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

EV Service Scholar Essay Contestants: Due to the large number of essay entries received, we would like to extend the winner announcement time to June 30.  Winners will be announced on our website.  Thank you for your patience. Please stay tuned! Happy Summer!

Posted: 2/4/2010 - 3 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 62 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

 We invite all high school and middle school students to use your creativity to make a video documentary telling an inspiring story about a service project you've been involved in. You can share about a volunteer activity you do in your community, interview a local hero, interview a local non-profit organization, interview people who's lives were impacted by you. This should be an inspirational video on why more students should do community service. Please make it captivating, documentary format, and use motion graphics and effects if possible.

 
Community Service Requirement: All applicants must complete 5 hours of community service and show proof of service to quality for the contest. All students enrolled in Middle School and High School (6th-12th) in the United States and Canada are eligible to apply.
 
Contest Deadline: Memorial Day, Monday, May 31, 2010, 5:00pm
 
Video Length: 3-6 minutes)
 
Award
Top 3 Winners receive Flip Ultra 120-Minute Camcorders.
 
Video entries should be uploaded onto Youtube, Titled: East Villagers Video Contest: [Name of Video] by [Student Name]; Send an email to eastvillagers@gmail.com with your community service verification form, name, school, age, and link to youtube video. Please also add the youtube video to www.eastvillagers.org with a complete profile so we can identify the student.
 
This Contest is Sponsored by the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation to Promote a Spirit of Volunteerism Among the Younger Generation

Posted: 2/2/2010 - 7 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 65 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

This is the first year the East Villagers Non-Profit Community is offering a chance for young service scholars within the local community to express their passion for community service through essay writing and art. Our goal is to promote a spirit of volunteerism among the younger generation around the world. Winners from Northern California will be invited to read their essays at the annual Service Scholar Award Celebration hosted by the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation. Students must complete 5 hours of community service and fill out the Service Requirement Form to provide proof. All students enrolled in schools Kindergarten through High School in the United States and Canada are eligible to apply.

Choose one of the following prompts to write an essay:
Prompt 1: Please share a volunteer experience and its impact on your life.
Prompt 2: Why is community service important in your life?
Prompt 3: Share about an experience when someone helped you and how it impacted your life.
Poster Theme: Having Fun Helping Others

Community Service Requirement: All applicants must complete 5 hours of community service and show proof of service to qualify for the contest. 

Contest Deadline: Wednesday, May 31, 2010, 5:00pm

High School (1000 - 1500 words)
Middle School (500 - 750 words)
KG - Grade 5 Poster Contest (Maximum Size 16" x 20")

Awards
High School
1st Place $500, 2nd Place $350, 3rd Place $150
Middle School
1st Place $300, 2nd Place $200, 3rd Place $75
KG - 5th Grade
1st Place $100, 2nd Place $75, 3rd Place $50

Submission Instructions
1. Please fill out the Contest Entry Form and Community Service Requirement Form. Click here to download. Contest Entry Form, Service Requirement Form, and Essay should be mailed to 800 High Street, Suite 408, Palo Alto, CA 94301 or faxed to (650) 323-2179.
2. Essays should be posted as a blog entry on www.eastvillagers.org.  We encourage you to include photos of your service activities in your blog entries.

Frequently Asked Questions
1. Is this open to only Northern California students? No, this is open to all students enrolled in K-12 throughout the United States and Canada.
2. How do I post a blog entry? Click create a blog entry at the top.
3. Why are there funny codes on my blog entry? First paste your word document into notepad, and then paste it into the blog editor to clear word formatting.
4. I am confused about the instructions, what am I supposed to do? Two simple steps: a) Mail the paper application, service requirement, and paper essay to us b) Post your essay as a blog entry
5. Can I send in past certificates and proof of community service instead of getting more signatures for the service requirement? Yes.

Please email eastvillagers@gmail.com or call (650) 924-1104 for more information.

This Contest is Sponsored by the Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation to Promote a Spirit of Volunteerism Among the Younger Generation

Posted: 1/13/2010 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 67 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: General Blog

From MTV.com

The American Red Cross has a full-time staff on the ground in Haiti, providing ongoing HIV/AIDS prevention and disaster preparedness programs, and has already pledged an initial $200,000 to assist communities impacted by the earthquake. They seek additional donations to continue providing food, water, temporary shelter, medical services and emotional support.

UNICEF saw its offices in Port-au-Prince suffer heavy damages in the earthquake, but is ready to provide relief, deploying "essential aid" — safe water, sanitation supplies, therapeutic foods, temporary shelter materials and medical supplies — to assist in recovery efforts.

Yele Haiti is Wyclef's own charitable organization, and has established an online donation site to help victims of the earthquake. Through his Twitter account, he's also asking his fans to lend a hand, by making a $5 donation by texting YELE to 501 501.

Direct Relief International is a U.S.-based organization that provides medical assistance to impoverished nations, and has committed up to $1 million to aid emergency response efforts. Already, they have sent two 40-by-20-foot containers packed with more than $420,000 of medicine, supplies and food to St. Damien Children's Hospital in Port-au-Prince.

World Vision has worked in Haiti for 30 years, and is seeking donations to provide victims with food, water, blankets and tents.

Operation USA already operates in Haiti, and is sending medical aid, water-purification supplies and food supplements to the nation.

Convoy of Hope has established a command center just outside of Port-au-Prince, and is distributing food, water and supplies to the victims of the earthquake.

Samaritan's Purse is a Christian organization that, for over 35 years, has provided assistance to victims of natural disaster, war, disease and famine. In Haiti, they are helping survivors with food, water and temporary shelter.

Also, the State Department has set up a toll-free number to call for information about family members in Haiti: (888) 407-4747.

Source: http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1629607/20100113/jean_wyclef.jhtml

 

Posted: 12/18/2009 - 4 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 137 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

 

 

East Villagers is back and running with rapid speed!

Reminder: EV Points will reset December 31, 11:59 PM PST. 

If you plan on buying something at the EV Store, please do so before this date. Villagers will start anew on New Years!

The EV Team is traveling to Shanghai and Beijing to create a Chinese version of East Villagers for China.

Posted: 11/26/2009 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 125 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

Dear Villagers,

We want to say thank you so much for the passion and enthusiasm that you've put into the EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge.  We've had so much fun checking and updating your points as you've been earning them, especially the hard core villagers who stayed up all the way until 11:59:59 PM PST earning points and donating until the last second.

As this is our first time carrying out the challenge, we want to say we greatly appreciate your patience with the server lag all the way until the end. Thanks for the strong support. We are always working hard to make EV the best it could be for you, and we will solve this issue asap.

Happy Thanksgiving and Good Night, Villagers!

May you enjoy today with your family and loved ones.

Best wishes,

EV Team

p.s. We are announcing the winners before noon on Thanksgiving Day! =P

Posted: 11/24/2009 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 109 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

Dear East Villagers,

On this Thanksgiving day,
we come together on ev,
we share on ev,
we celebrate on ev,
we donate Thanksgiving points on ev, … and,
we simply GIVE THANKS .. on ev.

THANK YOU charities.
THANK YOU fellow East Villagers,
THANK YOU ev staff.

Happy Thanksgiving and Holidays to all.

親愛的東村族朋友們

今天是感恩節
我們一同來到ev網
我們分享
我們慶祝
我們捐出.....感恩節積分
我們單純的感恩

感謝 慈善公益機構
感謝 東村族朋友們
感謝 東村族同工們

祝大家感恩節曰快樂

- Ping & Amy Chao

Posted: 11/24/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 133 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: Evaluation Report

Ping & Amy Chao 家庭基金会“小红巾”甘肃省儿童心脏外科手术

项目评估报告

2009年8月25日到9月1日,受赵修平夫妇基金会委托,北京师范大学社会发展公共政策学院社会公益研究中心的2名研究人员前往甘肃调研,对由赵修平夫妇基金会与美国角声基金会合作在当地开展的甘肃省儿童心脏外科手术项目开展了为期1周的评估。本评估报告共分五部分:评估背景、评估过程、评估研究方法、评估结果、项目建议。

Please click here to download Full PDF report (1.2 MB).
 

Posted: 11/23/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 108 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

Thanksgiving Challenge Prizes
First Place Winner - $2000
Second Place Winner - $1500
Third Place Winner - $1000
Fourth Place Winner - $800
Fifth Place Winner - $700
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400
Total Prize: $10,000

 

Thanksgiving Points Challenge Participating NGOs

Little Red Scarf (小紅巾) - 40142
Team HBV Collegiate Chapters - 34974
Technology and Education: Connecting Cultures - 7415
Project RISHI - 4743
Sino Canada Culture Association - 3177
4C the Power - 2099
Good Samaritans Medical Ministry - 1211
Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps - 1163
Yang Guang Gong Yi - 900
Alberta Chinese Zither Association - 518

Asian Liver Center - 400
Go and Love Foundation - 0
Rural China Education Foundation - 0
Southeast Asian Service Leadership Network - 0
Fudan Elite Leadership Program - 0



Total Donated Points: 97,210
Total Villagers Donating: 82
Last Updated on Monday, November 23, 2009, 2:58 PM PST.
*Red colored organizations still need at least 10 villagers to donate their cause to qualify for the challenge.

Useful Information
- Donation Form: Fill out this form to donate points.
- Points Vault: Click here to check your point balance.
- EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge Information
- Point Leaders Board
- Points FAQ

 

What Villagers are Saying about the Thanksgiving Points Challenge:

  • This activity is very amazing.
  • it's lovely.
  • Exciting, fun.
  • Awesome!!
  • Very interesting. I hope to join it.
  • This is a great idea! It really gets users more involved on the EV site.
  • This is a very rewarding program. 
  • it's great! thank you so much!
  • I think this is an awesome way for EV to promote this site and allow members to realize it's full potential. It is also a much needed fundraiser and a good way to promote teamwork among members!!!
  • Thank you!!!
  • Ultra cool.  Feels like you can make a difference.
  • I think it's a great idea.  Not only is giving money to these organizations a great thing, but it also motivates the users of EV to go check out each organization and see what they do.  Who knows where that could lead in the future.
  • Nice Active
  • I love this idea! It allows me to show supports to organization even if I'm a poor college student. It also helps a lot of small progressing organizations out there to get their voices out and to be heard.
  • 中文字再大一点
  • 很好的一个活动,有利于EV网络的推广,更有助于支持民间的公益活动。
  • It should continue again next year!
  • It's a great idea!
  • Awesome
  • 非常好的活动,意义深刻。希望中文版尽快开站,让中国的草根NGO组织得到更大的支持。
  • 这是个很棒的方法,其实还可以有更多增加积分的方式,比如把身边的人介绍进EV
  • It does good to the nonprofit organizations especially operated by college students.They will have enough money to do activities.
  • I would like to donate my point to SCCA which has been doing a lot of good things for the community over the years. 
  • 感谢给我们团队参加的机会,让我们团队更加壮大,能帮助更多的人。
  • Very nice gesture, especially during this time of year.
  • Giving those who dont have the time to actually help physcially, a chance to help others who are in need.
  • 很好的活动,“感恩节”献爱心很好。
  • Very generous!!!
     

 

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最新声明:
立刻参加“感恩节 送积分 赢奖金”的活动。我们欢迎更多的中国公益组织参与这个活动。你即使不在美国也没有关系,只要EV和Chao基金能够证实你在你自己的国家里是真实存在的就行,就可以参加这个活动。在eastvillagers.org 注册并创建了机构的主页,至少有10人捐赠积分,你的机构就有机会赢取最高金额为2000美元的奖金!还犹豫什么呢?

点击这里: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php 参与这个活动吧!

 

感恩节 送积分 赢奖金积分捐赠表: 又是一年一度的感恩节了。这个星期,你将有机会把你辛苦获得的积分捐赠给你最喜爱的非营利机构,表达你的感谢和喜爱,并把这样的关爱传播到世界的每一个角落。

Thanksgiving Challenge Prizes 奖金分布表
First Place Winner - $2000 冠军:2000美元
Second Place Winner - $1500 亚军:1500美元
Third Place Winner - $1000 军:1000美元
Fourth Place Winner - $800 第四名:800美元
Fifth Place Winner - $700 第五名:700美元
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400 第六名至第15名:各400美元

Posted: 11/20/2009 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 111 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

It's that time of year that you've all been waiting for -- that's right, Thanksgiving! This week, you will have an opportunity to donate your hard earned points to the causes you are most passionate about.  You'll be able to show them how thankful you are that they exist and are doing amazing things all around the world. Villagers can donate anytime and as many times as you'd like from now until November 25, 2009, 11:59 PM PST. Winners are announced before noon on Thanksgiving Day.

Click here to fill out the donation form: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php

NGOs can still apply to be added to the list of qualified organizations until Sunday, November 22, 2009. Click here to fill out the Application Form.

Thanksgiving Challenge Prizes
First Place Winner - $2000
Second Place Winner - $1500
Third Place Winner - $1000
Fourth Place Winner - $800
Fifth Place Winner - $700
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400
Total Prize: $10,000


Little Red Scarf (小紅巾) - 18598
Team HBV Collegiate Chapters - 11368
Sino Canada Culture Association - 1770
Technology and Education: Connecting Cultures - 1039
Asian Liver Center - 400
4C the Power - 0
Project RISHI - 0
Rural China Education Foundation - 0
Southeast Asian Service Leadership Network - 0
Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps - 0
Good Samaritan Medical Ministry - 0

Total Donated Points: 34,175
Total Villagers Donating: 20
Last Updated on Friday, November 20, 2009, 10:42 AM PST.

Useful Information
- NGO Application Form: NGOs can still apply.
- Donation Form: Fill out this form to donate points.
- Points Vault: Click here to check your point balance.
- EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge Information
- Point Leaders Board
- Points FAQ

------------------------------------------------------

最新声明:
立刻参加“感恩节 送积分 赢奖金”的活动。我们欢迎更多的中国公益组织参与这个活动。你即使不在美国也没有关系,只要EV和Chao基金能够证实你在你自己的国家里是真实存在的就行,就可以参加这个活动。在eastvillagers.org 注册并创建了机构的主页,至少有10人捐赠积分,你的机构就有机会赢取最高金额为2000美元的奖金!还犹豫什么呢?

加入东村族,注册成功的村民可以通过各种活动 (参见右下角的列表)获取积分。在感恩节前一周,东村族的成员将有机会捐出自己的积分,送给自己喜爱的非营利机构。在感恩节当天,积分排名前15位的非营利机构将获得来自赵修平夫妇基金会捐赠的,总额为10,000美元的奖金,其中,积分排名第一的非营利机构将获得最高奖金额2,000美元。中国的非营利组织请点击此链接 :参与此次活动

点击这里: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php 参与这个活动吧!

 

感恩节 送积分 赢奖金积分捐赠表: 又是一年一度的感恩节了。这个星期,你将有机会把你辛苦获得的积分捐赠给你最喜爱的非营利机构,表达你的感谢和喜爱,并把这样的关爱传播到世界的每一个角落。

Thanksgiving Challenge Prizes 奖金分布表
First Place Winner - $2000 冠军:2000美元
Second Place Winner - $1500 亚军:1500美元
Third Place Winner - $1000 军:1000美元
Fourth Place Winner - $800 第四名:800美元
Fifth Place Winner - $700 第五名:700美元
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400 第六名至第15名:各400美元

Posted: 11/19/2009 - 4 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 123 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

Thanksgiving Points Challenge Participating NGOs

Team HBV Collegiate Chapters - 60,593
Little Red Scarf (小紅巾) - 40,560
4C the Power - 36,269
Technology and Education: Connecting Cultures - 12,814
Sino Canada Culture Association - 12,316
Yang Guang Gong Yi - 12,183
Project RISHI - 8,764
------------------------------------------
*Still need 10 villagers to donate to qualify for the challenge.
Rural China Education Foundation - 6227
Southeast Asian Service Leadership Network - 2,928
Good Samaritans Medical Dental Ministry - 2,523
Alberta Chinese Zither Association - 1,986
Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps - 1,463
Asian Liver Center - 1,119
Go and Love Foundation - 0
Fudan Elite Leadership Program - 0


Total Donated Points: 200,632
Total Villagers Donating: 193
Last Updated on Wednesday, Nov 25, 2009, 1:14 AM PST.
*Red colored organizations still need at least 10 villagers to donate their cause to qualify for the challenge.

Useful Information
- NGO Application Form: NGOs can still apply.
- Donation Form: Fill out this form to donate points.
- Points Vault: Click here to check your point balance.
- EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge Information
- Point Leaders Board
- Points FAQ

Thanksgiving Points Donor List
(Some donors have not been updated yet. Please check back tomorrow for your names.)

Little Red Scarf (小紅巾)   
Teddy Shih - 12690
Ping Chao - 6598
Amy Chao - 2422
Edward Chao - 839
史惠清 - 603
Andy Xu - 639
Cleo Jie - 138
Gu Diyi - 119
Sunny - 162
Richard - 287
Qi - 114
Steven Gu - 441
Nancy Nguyen - 14787
YanYan Zhang - 100
Fiona Fan - 110
Clarissa Zhou - 100

Sino Canada Culture Association
Alice Yu - 730
Jessica Tao - 273
Lily Wang - 228
Christopher Wang - 261
Simon Wang - 278
Charles Liang - 126
Linda Tang - 413
Michael Shen - 309
Git Lim - 559
Jik Chan - 367

Technology and Education: Connecting Cultures (TECC)
Yuqi Liu - 204
Rebecca Lao - 224
Mavis Lee - 174
Roy Cheuk - 185
Wilson Chan - 252
Wang Qi - 250
Dan Liu - 758
施逢杰 - 200
Elite Fudan - 2080
Alex Wang - 580
Alice Quan - 154
Chi Gao - 711
Chen Long - 190
钱春阳 - 166
Qilin Wang - 100
Yang Li - 148
Xiao Chen - 321
郑慧莲 - 318
Clarissa Zhou - 400

Team HBV Collegiate Chapters
Jie Zhu - 50 (All Chapters)
Rebecca Hu - 7851 (Berkeley)
Mark Albers - 2941 (Stanford)
Mark Lin - 207 (Harvard)
Francis Deng - 2572 (Harvard)
Kim Truong - 132 (Stanford)
YingYing Guan - 150 (UC Davis)
Christina Chechotka - 408 (All Chapters)
Nicole Tantoco - 5866 (Stanford)
Lily Zhang - 859 (Berkeley)
Alina Wong - 2108 (UCLA)
Joy Zhang - 4276 (Stanford)
Tiffany Chia - 700 (Berkeley)
Greg Lam - 1300 (Berkeley)
Jennifer Yang - 5554 (Berkeley)

===============================================================

*Red colored organizations still need at least 10 villagers to donate their cause to qualify for the challenge.


Asian Liver Center at Stanford University (ALC)
Jie Zhu - 50
YingYing Guan - 350

4C the Power   
Mimi Uong - 428
Justine Talag - 1000
Sabrina Galang - 671
Janie Cha - 2727
Diann Kitamura - 1000

Project RISHI
Sivapratha Nagappan - 4593
Humsini Viswanath - 407
Luan Nguyen - 179
Uday Galati - 220
Vijay Bhat - 976
Juhi Goswamy - 131
Nikita Khetan - 392

Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps
SyChing Lee - 900
Sally Liao - 122
Lee Yie-Zong - 141

Yang Guang Gong Yi
耀明张 - 300
YanYan Zhang - 3300
Xunmei Meng - 200
晓萍聂 - 300
Peijuan Liu - 320

Alberta Chinese Zither Association
Wilson Jien - 518

Good Samaritans Medical Dental Ministry
Julie Van - 1211

Southeast Asian Service Leadership Network (SEALNet)   
Nguyet Tong - 145

Rural China Education Foundation (RCEF)    

Fudan Elite Leadership Program


 
Last Updated on Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 6:58 PM PST.

*Updates will be posted once everyday.

Posted: 11/18/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 117 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

It's that time of year that you've all been waiting for -- that's right, Thanksgiving! This week, you will have an opportunity to donate your hard earned points to the causes you are most passionate about.  You'll be able to show them how thankful you are that they exist and are doing amazing things all around the world. Click here to fill out the donation form: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php

Thanksgiving Challenge Prizes
First Place Winner - $2000
Second Place Winner - $1500
Third Place Winner - $1000
Fourth Place Winner - $800
Fifth Place Winner - $700
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400
Total Prize: $10,000

Thanksgiving Points Challenge Participating NGOs

Team HBV Collegiate Chapters - 60,593
Little Red Scarf (小紅巾) - 40,560
4C the Power - 36,269
Technology and Education: Connecting Cultures - 12,814
Sino Canada Culture Association - 12,316
Yang Guang Gong Yi - 12,183
Project RISHI - 8,764

------------------------------------------

*Still need 10 villagers to donate to qualify for the challenge.
Rural China Education Foundation - 6227
Southeast Asian Service Leadership Network - 2,928
Good Samaritans Medical Dental Ministry - 2,523
Alberta Chinese Zither Association - 1,986
Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps - 1,463
Asian Liver Center - 1,119
Go and Love Foundation - 0
Fudan Elite Leadership Program - 0

 

Total Donated Points: 200,632

 

Total Villagers Donating: 193

 


Last Updated on Wednesday, Nov 25, 2009, 1:14 AM PST.

*Red colored organizations still need at least 10 villagers to donate their cause to qualify for the challenge.

 



Useful Information
- NGO Application Form: NGOs can still apply.
- Donation Form: Fill out this form to donate points.
- Points Vault: Click here to check your point balance.
- EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge Information
- Point Leaders Board
- Points FAQ

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the EV Thanksgiving Points Challenge?
A week before Thanksgiving, members of East Villagers will have an opportunity to donate their points to their favorite nonprofits. On Thanksigiving Day, the top 15 nonprofit organizations with the most points will receive a total donation of $10,000 dollars from the Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation. First place organization will be awarded $2,000.

How can I earn points?
Villagers can earn points by doing any of the following activities listed on this page: http://www.eastvillagers.org/topusers.php

How do I donate my points?
You can donate your points by filling out this donation form: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php

When can I donate my points?
You can donate your anytime points from November 19, 2009 12:00 AM PST to November 25, 2009, 11:59pm PST. If you earned additional points during the period, you can fill out the form again.

Where do I go to check if my donation is added to the database?
You can check your points vault here: http://www.eastvillagers.org/user_vault.php

When will you announce the winners?
We will announce the winners on Thanksgiving Day before noon.  We will be posting daily donation updates on the EV homepage. Winners will be asked to record a short "YES! I WON!" video describing how they feel about winning, expressing thank you to the Chao Foundation, and post the video on EV within a week.

Can I save my points for next Thanksgiving?
No, points will refresh on December 31, 2009, 11:59 PST.  You will still maintain your point ranking but your balance will be "0".

Will points subtract if I purchased an item at the store?
Yes, you can spend your points at the store or donate them during Thanksgiving. If you are the first 25 to purchase the tshirt for 1/2 off, your points will not subtract from the Thanksgiving program.

I heard that there is a limit on the number of points you can earn each day, what is the maximum number of points I can earn in a single day?
Check here for the daily limits of number of points you can earn: http://www.eastvillagers.org/user_points_faq.php

What do I do if I see people not following the rules?
Please go to the user's profile and click "Report this Person" if you see users creating blank/meaningless/spam blogs and deleting their blogs for points or joining and leaving groups/projects.  We always closely monitor activity on EV to prevent this.  We will subtract points as a warning and if  the situation persists, we will have to disqualify the user from the Thanksgiving Challenge.

------------------------------------------------------

最新声明:
立刻参加“感恩节 送积分 赢奖金”的活动。我们欢迎更多的中国公益组织参与这个活动。你即使不在美国也没有关系,只要EV和Chao基金能够证实你在你自己的国家里是真实存在的就行,就可以参加这个活动。在eastvillagers.org 注册并创建了机构的主页,至少有10人捐赠积分,你的机构就有机会赢取最高金额为2000美元的奖金!还犹豫什么呢?

加入东村族,注册成功的村民可以通过各种活动 (参见右下角的列表)获取积分。在感恩节前一周,东村族的成员将有机会捐出自己的积分,送给自己喜爱的非营利机构。在感恩节当天,积分排名前15位的非营利机构将获得来自赵修平夫妇基金会捐赠的,总额为10,000美元的奖金,其中,积分排名第一的非营利机构将获得最高奖金额2,000美元。中国的非营利组织请点击此链接 :参与此次活动

点击这里: http://www.eastvillagers.org/tg_form.php 参与这个活动吧!

 

感恩节 送积分 赢奖金积分捐赠表: 又是一年一度的感恩节了。这个星期,你将有机会把你辛苦获得的积分捐赠给你最喜爱的非营利机构,表达你的感谢和喜爱,并把这样的关爱传播到世界的每一个角落。

奖金分布表
First Place Winner - $2000 冠军:2000美元
Second Place Winner - $1500 亚军:1500美元
Third Place Winner - $1000 军:1000美元
Fourth Place Winner - $800 第四名:800美元
Fifth Place Winner - $700 第五名:700美元
6th - 15th Place Winners - $400 第六名至第15名:各400美元

Posted: 11/9/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 135 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

East Villagers Thanksgiving Points Challenge

You Donate Points, EV Donates $10,000!

On Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 26), the Top 15 Organizations with the most donated points will win a total of $10,000 grant from the Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation.  First place gets $2,000.  You can directly help by earning points today! Click here to see the Thanksgiving Points Leader Board. Non-Profit Organizations - Please fill out this application to qualify: http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dFgtTFJhR3c3RDFHNnpSM2NINDVKLVE6MA

Point donations begin on Monday, Nov. 16, 2009. Please spread the word and FORWARD this email to all your friends.

 



The 1st Annual Team HBV Conference 2009: Sharing strategies and best practices among college chapters focusing on hepatitis B and liver cancer awareness, community outreach and education as part of the Jade Ribbon Campaign will be held at Stanford University on November 13-15, 2009. Representatives of the China university chapters are invited to stay at Stanford for a few additional days from November 9-16, 2009. Follow your friends and chapter members throughout the conference! All Team HBV Conference attendees will be sharing their thoughts and experiences LIVE throughout the conference using East Villagers and other social media networks. Visit www.eastvillagers.org on November 14 & 15 to watch the conference LIVE!

Posted: 11/9/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 351 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: EV Events

赵修平“青年人如何参与社会公益和公益创业”北师大沙龙诚邀参与

主讲人:Ping Chao赵 修 平

主题:青年人如何参与社会公益和公益创业

主讲人简介:

 美国硅谷著名企业家,凯登斯(Cadence)创办人

 赵修平家族基金会(Ping Amy Family Foundation)创始人

 东村族公益平台(East Villagers Non-Profit Community)创建人

内容简介:

       在美国,从公益领域进行创业已成为许多青年人寻求就业和实现自我人生价值的途径,但如何在创业中运用最好的理念,善用最新的科技,发挥青年人的优势和创造力,在创业中有优胜的把握?曾经创办过美国著名的凯登斯(Cadence)等三家赚钱公司的赵修平,2005年开始公益创业,创建了赵修平家族基金会和东村族公益平台,他将结合自己多年在美国硅谷的企业创业经验和公益创业理念,与我们分享如何将企业、科技创业观念带到公益创业事业中来,并分享他的公益创业的心得和乐趣,鼓励青年思考和探索公益创业,分享他的资源来支持和指导大学生进行公益创业。

时间:2009年11月10日(周二)下午2:00—3:00

地点:北师大英东楼318

 

Zhao Xiu-Ping, "how young people participate in social and public entrepreneurship," Beijing Normal University are invited to participate in Salon

Speaker:
Ping Chao Zhao Xiu-Ping

Subject: how young people participate in social and public entrepreneurship

Speaker Introduction:

  Well-known Silicon Valley entrepreneur, Cadence (Cadence), founder of
  Zhao Xiu-Ping Family Foundation (Ping Amy Family Foundation), founder of
  East Village Family Community Platform (East Villagers Non-Profit Community) founder

Brief Introduction:

        In the United States, from the public area of entrepreneurship has become a lot of young people to seek employment and achieve self-life value of the way, but how to use the best ideas in business, make use of latest technology, strengths and creativity of young people play in the There are better grasp of business? Founder of the United States has been well-known Cadence (Cadence) and three profitable companies Zhao Xiu-Ping, public business in 2005, created the Family Foundation, and Zhao Xiu-Ping Tung family welfare platform, he will combine his many years in the U.S. Silicon Valley corporate entrepreneurial experience, and social entrepreneurship ideas to share with us how business, technology entrepreneurs bring ideas to the cause of social entrepreneurship, and to share his experiences and fun social entrepreneurship and encourage young people to think and explore the public enterprise, to share his resources to Community college students support and guidance to entrepreneurs.

Time: 2009 11 Yue 10 Ri (Zhouer) 2:00-3:00 pm

Location: Beijing Normal University East Building 318 United Kingdom

Posted: 10/13/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 107 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: Other

Entitled "Family". Directed by the critically acclaimed and award winning film director, Yasmin Ahmad, and commissioned by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports "MCYS". The story portrays a father's love for his daughter...Family Singapore MCYS Youth Commercial

 

English Version:

 

 

Chinese Version:

 

Posted: 10/13/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 106 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

"Funeral" is a new TV commerical launched by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) which looks at relationships in a different light, through a woman at her husband's funeral. Ultimately, the TVC celebrates the beautiful imperfections that make a relationship perfect. This is fresh off MCYS latest Viewers' Choice 2008 win for last year's Family TVC which promotes the importance and value of family bonding.

http://www.facebook.com/beautifullyim...
http://www.thinkfamily.sg/
http://www.mcys.gov.sg/
http://yasminthefilmmaker.blogspot.com/

 

 

Posted: 10/13/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 198 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: Project Story

Blog #1: My First Medical Mission

 

 I strolled out from the ‘white Tower’ by chance to see a different world and did what I wanted to do. I guessed it’s similar for other volunteers— joining TRMPC to dedicate themselves for altruistic reasons.



The relief mission was the first Taiwan Root mission that I joined. Typhoon Morakot devastated southern Taiwan. TV news ceaselessly covered the miseries of the victims, taking the whole country to a torment with their scary reports. I could not repress my urge to go to the disaster areas to help those fellow people any longer.

When the September 21st Earthquake happened 10 years ago, I was only a residence doctor. I found myself tangled by my shifts in the hospital when I felt the same urge. After that, I had been busy studying my specialty or preparing for exams, which literally wore out my ideal and urge. The Morakot flood had given me a chance to act it out. I asked another doctor to be my substitute and signed in the Pingtung relief mission.

During the mission, many teammates asked me how I know the Taiwan Root. A year ago, there was a friend leaving a message in my blog, inviting me to participate in Taiwan Root medical missions. I suppose the name of the organization had been branded on my brain since then. After the flood happened, I contacted the south disaster control center and left my name to them, but I failed to receive any reply probably because there were too many medical volunteers or a few district hospitals had adopted the disaster areas.

My heart was restless for several days and the name of Taiwan Root popped out. I googled on the Web and found out they had just returned from a relief mission to Nantou, yet they didn’t post any news about the next mission. I made an inquiry call asking them if there’s another relief mission. One of their staff—Ms. Tseng if I remembered it right—wrote down my contact information and asked me to wait for further notification. A déjà vu maybe, I thought.

However, the next day, on my way to work, I received a phone call from Taiwan Root, saying the second relief mission was already scheduled and would be set out to Pingtung. I signed in at once. Few days later, I stepped on the road to the mission with my newly-bought bag pack, sleeping bag and wellies.

Thanks to the Taiwan High Rail. Their relief program, which transported over 70 volunteers to southern Taiwan with no charge, had been a great help. The jeeps of the R.O.C. Rescue Association picked us up and fled to our gathering spot, the Wentzu Elementary School. From these drivers conversation, I was moved by the fact that these drivers had been to the disaster areas in Tainan for over 10 days.

Although the Typhoon had passed for more than 10 days, we were shocked to see the still severe silting. The military were all over the place, trucks that carried mud were agitated on the streets. Fall semester will begin in one week, yet the Wentzu Elementary School was surrounded by mires and mud and the smell of rotten fish filled the air. We were there to help, I hoped with volunteers’ devotion, the place will be back to how it had been soon.

The military, volunteers and victims fought with the water and mud all day long. Large diggers were indispensible—they cleaned the roads to lead into more people to help, while they were too big to enter small alleys. Bulldozers, which were rented by the Taiwan Root, were perfect for cleaning alleys. Some of the medical volunteers went into the alleys with the bulldozers to help, some stayed at the medical station that we set up. It was such a distinct experience which is very worth-while even you got yourself all covered with mud.

I got to know lots of people from various backgrounds and discovered that many, just like me, joined the Taiwan Root mission for the first time. Then I realized that Taiwan Root had already been a cross-region organization, which is capable of summoning volunteers from everywhere without any relation to any hospital or religion. A Taiwan root mission is put together by assorted professions of volunteers, namely drivers, kitchen volunteers, administration volunteers and of course medical volunteers. I guessed these people were assembled by the faith of President Liu, founder of the Taiwan Root.

A nurse volunteer once asked me if there was any change this mission had brought me. I was speechless then, the question never came to me probably because years of working in hospitals had made me used to the course of life, the birth and mortality of human so to speak. Treating and helping patients were a doctor’s calling. I just strolled out from the ‘white Tower’ by chance to see a different world and did what I wanted to do. I guessed it’s similar for other volunteers— joining TRMPC to dedicate themselves for altruistic reasons. I was very pleased to become a member of this big Taiwan Root family. I hope in the future we will go to another place to help others together.

 

Blog #2: Boohoo, Give me my water heater

 


   It was a bit earlier than my own plan for me to do voluntary work for the Typhoon Morakot victims. I planned to go to the disaster areas till the disaster was about to be forgotten, for the road to rehabilitation is long on one hand, and the intention of reminding myself and others the relief work is not fully finished. Yet when I got the letter of recruiting volunteers from the Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps, I decided to join at once, even though I thought I might become the very garbage which needed to be moved away. I just couldn’t get the TV news report out of my head, I must SEE the disaster with my own eyes.

Of course I saw it and was frightened by the mud from 2-feet to over 2-meter deep. It’s not the mud that frightened me. It was already two weeks after the typhoon; the flood still hovered. That’s what frightened me. I was assigned to help the medical workers. One morning, I was transported by a bulldozer to help clean a duck farm. Under the relentless sun, not after long, I panted heavily like a dog. The driver of the bulldozer said I’d better just stick to the photographing work, yet I could hardly lift my camera. Watching those stubborn mud made me feel helpless. However, the bulldozer kept rotating like an un-nimble robot removing piles and piles of dirt. Two soldiers who were thinner than me had no choice but to endlessly shovel the mud.

A small troop of navy soldiers were cleaning a place named “Flamingo Park.” The mud was outrageous, the eyes of the soldiers seem hollow. I guessed they must have thought of the ocean. The drains surround us were filled with filthy tan water which just wouldn’t go away as the swamps on the tar roads. The aquaculture-noted township exhibited its products with belly-up fishes. Even people were about to turn their bellies up. I wondered when will the mud be removed and drains be clear, so that all the pain and heart-breaking will be drained.

Some of the medical workers also helped cleaning homes. They just couldn’t stand by feeling useless. They scrubbed the floor and swept out the water. With the water flowing out of the house, a grandma’s tears shed ceaselessly at the mud-stuffed sofa. The volunteers spoke nothing and resumed their cleaning job, letting the grandma gushing out her emotions. The other two volunteers couldn’t stand there watching the grandpa, grandma’s husband, sob. They pat on the grandpa’s shoulder with muddy hands while scrubbing. The 70-year-old grandpa swept at the back of his house, telling the volunteers the heater was a gift from his son. The floods had destroyed it as if his son’s filial affection had also been ruined. The volunteers and soldiers couldn’t comfort the grandpa. The only thing they could do was to keep moving the furniture and mopping. Once a piece of furniture was moved out of the house, the diligent bulldozer came pick it up and carried it away or it would obstruct the cleaning work on the street. The grandma stared at her bed being taken away, which she had cherished for decades, she blamed the grandpa for letting the bulldozer. The grandpa started weeping again, they wept together in fury and helplessness. Although the wooden bed was old, it still made it through the flood. The young soldiers and volunteers didn’t know what to do. Out of regrets, one of the soldiers said to the grandpa, ”I’ll buy a new bed for you.” These grandsons of their own grandpas, treasure of their own home sincerely wiped the tears on the grandpa’s face, as if they were his grandsons.

The soldiers, babies in their own home, soaked in water in wellies and water-proof suits. They got cut or scratched and rash climbed up their skin. Wrinkles crawled over the faces of the disaster victims; floods flushed away their belongings and rose their blood pressure.
Except for pulling up a soldier who fell in a drain and broke his leg, I spent most of my time shedding my tear and watching those medical workers do trauma cleaning. What a loser. Most of these soldiers were younger than my brother, they had done the relief work for at least a week, they just stood up and put on their wellies and went back to work in the mires after the wounds were treated. They looked exhausted yet innocent. I asked them when their next leave would be, they said after the relief mission they still have duties in the Deaflympic. It’s unbelievable. A once-in-a-while rest might be questioned by their superiors or the media. Even the bulldozer operators who used to the labor were worn out, not to mention these young soldiers.

But, why can’t the mud be gone? It’s the anxious victims and enthusiastic volunteers who let the filthy water flowing out of the house; the water and filth overloaded the drains.
The drains struggled to swallow the water and victims’ apprehension and they failed.

Finally, with the soldiers, I purged the drains and came to realize these drains are indispensable as veins in our flesh.

 

Blog #3: Deliver our Charity to the Disaster Area

 

This was the second time I and my classmates followed TRMPC on a mission. Last time we delivered our charity to the mountain areas, but this time we were going to deliver our charity to the disaster areas caused by Typhoon Morakot.

The night before departure, we felt a little bit complicated, looking forward to the mission this time but also fearing to be hurt, because there were many pieces of negative news reported by media such as how indignant the disaster victims were, how awful the condition was and how difficult it was to carry out the relief work etc. Such news gave us a vague impression about the disaster areas; however, we believed that if we had faith in common, the mission would still be replete with happiness and impressiveness.

The next morning we headed for the High Speed Rail Taichung Station where we took advantage of the “Free Ticket for Volunteers” package to get to Zuoying Station to meet the car fleet members. On arriving there, we saw familiar cars, familiar faces, and heard familiar voices, which reminded us of those days when we were being together on the mission last time and made us more confident about the mission this time.

On the first day, we went to Wun Fong Village at Jiadong Township, Pingtung County where once hard-working fish pond pumps had stopped and once full-of-water fish ponds had almost been dried. Villagers were either catching survived fish or cleaning up the mud water in the pond. Then we went to Wun Zih elementary school. There we found that the playground had already been fully parked with Humvees, disaster rescue trucks, and bulldozers etc. Besides, the classrooms had all been emptied either for medical room or rest area for volunteers. Seeing a scene of devastation everywhere made me feel very sad. It also occurred to me that in spite of living on the same piece of land and belonging to the same nation, we were lucky enough to enjoy a much more blissful life than those disaster victims.

A car fleet member told us that he saw lots of dried fish hanging on the trees, which was a really interesting but also heartbreaking image; after all, fish is the livelihood of those fish breeding families. The car fleet member also told us that some fish breeding families did not know whether to laugh or cry because they found that the precious giant groupers in their ponds were all gone and that the ponds were full of several modest species of fish now.

On the second day, we had a definite goal. We took a pickup truck at Jiadong train station and then transferred to a bulldozer to get into the disaster areas. Along the journey, we saw impressive images of our military working hard to help clean villagers’ houses and their surroundings. We took the initiative to go into a house and offer our help to the family. There were only two people living in that house-a grandpa and a grandma. While we were cleaning up the house, the grandma was trying very hard to protect the last two pieces of intact furniture -two plank beds. When the bulldozer ruthlessly shoveled her other soaked furniture away, she retreated back to her room and burst into crying. We had no idea how to comfort her and genuinely felt the ruthlessness of the typhoon.

In addition to helping clean victims’ houses, we also assisted TRMPC in medical care. Watching everybody being busy, I suddenly felt myself like a drop in the ocean. The first work I and my classmates were assigned to was registration, that was to fill out the forms for the residents, measure their blood pressure and temperature and usher them to the clinic room.

It never occurred to me to expect for any rewards from volunteer work; however, whenever I heard “thank you” from those I helped, I felt gratified. I also made some balloons to please the kids-the tricks which I learned from the Northern Thailand Volunteers training program. It warmed the cockles of my heart when I saw the joyful expressions on the kids’ face.

Participating in the relief work this time aroused in me more expectation and desire from engaging in volunteer services. As college students, we did not do much and helped a lot because we had no special expertise and little money, but we had resolute love in heart. Although this time the relief work only lasted for three days, I would keep the experience in mind. Thanks to TRMPC for giving us the chance to contribute to our society.
 

Blog #4: Remember the Moment

 

On the 8th of August 2009, Typhoon Morakot visited southern Taiwan. I was at my hometown, Tainan, when it happened. For the first time in my memory, I understood what it meant to rain cats and dogs, and nonstop, day after day. August 9th, on my way back to Taipei, everywhere I saw was engulfed by rainfall; the crop fields were nowhere to be seen, only the tip of the poles stuck out of the surface barely telling me where the roads were. The ducks in the fish pond walked to the free way because they had nowhere else to go. And we could only see the tip of the pomelo trees, as pomelo tree is just as tall as a man. Tears on my cheeks fell nonstop, just like the rainfall outside of the window.

Taitung was impacted heavily from this typhoon. The mountain on the east, particularly homes of the aboriginal tribes were isolated since roads were destroyed. It made the transporting of supply aids and communication of the news very difficult. The beautiful southbound railroad was also closed down—I haven’t even been on it! Even though there were less news of the situation in eastern Taiwan, I thought there should be many aboriginal tribes that needed help. Twenty days after the typhoon, I was on the plane from Taipei to Taitung. It might not be as immediate as I hoped, I still hope I could help those in need with my profession since the road of rebuilding will be a long ride.

In these 3 days, we travelled from Taimale and southward to Kinlun, Binmao, Lichiu, Tuban, Taiban tribes, most of them were homes of the Paiwan Tribe. I was happy to see that some daily supplies had already arrived at the area, and medical care forces were also enough. Yet the rebuilding of the roads and the homes buried by mudslides were still delayed. I saw an old lady from the tribe digging out the rocks with a shovel; I also saw a man stood in front of the rocks covering what was once door to his home. Construction of the minds seemed to be a very important step for the victims. Nevertheless, they still continue to live their lives everyday such as going to the church, cleaning the aftermath and caring for the children. And from the smiles of the children welcoming us, we realized how they treasure they live in the moment to deal with the hardship. We also saw how they manage to coexist with our mother nature, which is a lesson that everyone in this material world needs to learn. The aboriginal tribes may be less exposed to our society, yet they are not to be forgotten. By being at the scene, it was very difficult to imagine how much difference there were between two places in one country—it was like being in a complete different world. I almost break into tears whenever I think of them.

More importantly, I really hope the disaster relief is not just a temporarily attention that is neglected soon after. One of the chiefs once said “water will always seek its way back to the source; it is going to win back what belongs to him that was long taken by human.” It is my dearest hope for us people to remember the lesson learned from our history, to be a person that remembers.

 

Blog #5: My Yard is in the Pacific Ocean

 

I have heard of Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps ever since the happening of 921 Earthquake, but I have yet to join any of the medical missions until now. I have been anticipating for the day with excitement and nervousness. On the day before the trip, I met an experience doctor who told me stories from his past trips, which made me even more excited. However, being a respiratory therapist, I really was not sure what I could really do for the victims from Typhoon Morakot But I was once a scrub-in nurse, I should be able to help out with my profession at some point. I would just wait and see what my assignment was.

The day had finally arrived. With my lightly packed personal belongings, I was at the meeting point at 2:30 am and was very fired up seeing the cars lined up waiting for volunteers. Yet when I saw the assignment sheet, the thing I was worried the most happened: I was assigned to be a respiratory therapist! Not helping with the resources, assisting the doctors or helping in the kitchen, I was to do what I do best—respiratory therapy. However, I did not bring any necessary equipment, not even a stethoscope! How was I supposed to do my job without those? Although I was told to get some sleep in the ride before we arrive at the disaster area, I just could not go to sleep thinking about what would happen once we got there.

When we arrived at our destination, we followed the lead of the experienced volunteers to unload, prepare and set up the location. Most of the patients who came were those with chronic diseases, cold or toothache; there was rarely a patient for me which made my worries go away. Therefore, I started helping out with everything and everywhere for the next three days and was able to get involved with the local people in the aboriginal areas. All of these tribal villages were unheard of in my life; I might not even have a chance to go there if it were not for this medical mission. Nevertheless, I respect how positive and optimistic the people were—they were only thankful to everything rather than complaining even under such harsh conditions. Even with their homes destroyed, they could still smile and say “my home has fallen into the pacific ocean!” some even wrote a song named “my yard is in the pacific ocean,” which made me feel heartbroken.

Besides from learning from the aboriginal people, I was also touched by all the volunteers from Taiwan Root. Even though everyone came with different backgrounds, but they all came with a passionate heart. There was one eight-years-old retired doctor who I respected the most. He drove down by himself and met up with us at Taimale. He always chose to follow us to the most challenging areas and followed the team on the narrow windy mountain roads. He did not talk about any appraising life stories, but he did sit on the ground and chit chat with everyone without posing. When seeing the patients, he explained and answered every question with patient and kindness. In addition, our drivers were also elites coming from different career backgrounds. Yet they sacrificed their vacations willingly, helping out in every way they could so that this trip could end successfully.

Even though I did not prepare enough for this trip, I still saw and learned a lot. I would like to thank every volunteer on the team, Mr. Lin from car 307 who took everyone for a soothing hot spring, Mr. Liao who drove all the way, and also Ms. Luo who treated us a delicious dinner in Luotung. In the future,I will prepare myself as much as I can to do my best in the next mission.

 

Blog #6: Let's go energetic mission meal

 


A few months ago, my friend and I decided to join the medical mission to Hualien together. Unfortunately on the 8th of August, a terrible flood was caused by Typhoon Morakot. After making sure with Taiwan Root that we need to bring gloves and rain shoes, we knew exactly that we would be going to the villages that were heavily damaged.

At the same 2:45 am, everybody gathered in front of NTU as usual but without the excitement we used to have. Instead, there was worry in the air. We set out for Taitung after everyone got their name tags and loaded up their luggage.
The sun was just about to rise up as we stopped by Hualien for a little break and breakfast. As we drove toward our destination, we saw the Pacific Ocean and the blue sky merging into one line and became almost indistinguishable. The coastal scenery was still astonishing as ever, yet we were in no mood to enjoy the beauty because somewhere else on this land has been impacted heavily. With the concern in mind, we arrived at our first stop.

As we entered the impacted area, we saw riverbed filled with floating broken branches and houses flooded by the water. Even though I have seen plenty of images on the news media, I was still shocked to wordless. We quickly calmed ourselves down and began to unload and started working. Since we did not bring any food ingredients from Taipei, we had to shop for the food locally. Even though it was not my first time to the traditional Taiwanese market, preparing food for 80 people was my first and our head chef A-mei was really worried that we could not make it in time. After the ingredients and portion were quickly decided, everyone started shopping for meats and vegetables with our fastest speeds. We encountered a very enthusiastic vendor who gave us a great deal on foods when she knew that we were here to help, which made us realize that the most beautiful thing on this island is our people with genuine and passionate hearts.

Brining back all the ingredients to the village, everyone worked on different tasks together under the direction of the head chef. We managed to finish preparing in time for lunch so everyone could enjoy a tasty meal. After lunch, we started packing and moving toward the next village. Thanks to our head chef A-mei and her professional experiences, we were able to prepare delicious and nutritious meals and made us volunteers full of energy.

From this disaster relief trip with Taiwan Root, we saw bridges broken, roads destroyed, houses flooded and riverbed with broken branches which all made us fearful of the power of nature. Even though catastrophes were brought by the flood, it also brought out the most genuine, passionate hearts from people. We also witness the courage and strength of those who lost their homes, and still fought to survive optimistically. As physically tired as we were, we came home with hearts full of love for the people and the island.

 

Posted: 9/27/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Other

MANILA, Philippines – Many Filipino villagers managed to save only the clothes on their backs but began to rebuild Sunday as the flood waters receded from a tropical storm that set off the worst flooding in the Philippine capital in 42 years and left about 80 dead.

Army troops, police and civilian volunteers plucked dead bodies from muddy flood waters and rescued drenched survivors from rooftops after Tropical Storm Ketsana tore through the northern Philippines a day earlier, leaving at least 106 people dead and missing.

Some residents began to clean up as the flood waters receded. Still, many parts of the capital remained flooded. A brief period of sunshine showed the extent of the devastation in many neighborhoods — destroyed houses, overturned vehicles, and roads covered in debris and mud. Read more.. (via yahoo news)

 

 
==============================================================

How You Can Help -- Current Relief Efforts:

 
Please forward your donations to any of the following: (please reblog/retweet/repost to spread the word).
 
Red Cross
1. CASH or CHECK
Please send cash or check donations to the PNRC National Headquarters in Manila. Checks should be made payable to The Philippine National Red Cross. They can arrange for donation pick-up.

2. BANK DEPOSIT
Account Name: The Phil. Nat’l. Red Cross

METROBANK
Port Area Branch
Peso Acct.: 151-3-041-63122-8
Dollar Acct.: 151-2-151-00218-2
Type of Acct. : SAVINGS
Swift Code: MBTC PH MM

BANK OF THE PHIL. ISLANDS
Port Area Branch
Peso Acct.: 4991-0010-99
Type of Account: CURRENT

BANK OF THE PHIL. ISLANDS
UN Branch
Dollar Acct.: 8114-0030-94
Type of Account: SAVINGS
Swift Code: BOPI PH MM

For your donations to be properly acknowledged, please fax the bank transaction slip at nos. +63.2.527.0575 or +63.2.404.0979 with your name, address and contact number.

Credit Card

Please fax the following info to +632.404.09.79 and +632.527.0575:

Name of card member, billing address, contact nos. (phone & mobile), credit card no., expiration date, CCV2/ CVC2 (last three digits at the back of the credit card), billing address, amount to be donated.

For online donations you may also visit our website at www.redcross.org.ph .

In-Kind Donations

LOCAL
Please send in-kind local donations to The Philippine National Red Cross – National Headquarters in Manila. They could also arrange for donation pick-up.

INTERNATIONAL

1. Send a letter of intent to donate to the PNRC
2. A letter of acceptance from PNRC shall be sent back to the donor
3. Immediately after shipping the goods, please send the (a) original Deed of Donation, (b) copy of packing list and (c) original Airway Bill for air shipments or Bill of Lading for sea shipments to The Philippine National Red Cross–National Headquarters c/o Secretary General Corazon Alma de Leon, Bonifacio Drive, Port Area, Manila 2803, Philippines.

SMS and G-CASH

SMS
text REDAMOUNT to 2899 (Globe) or 4483 (Smart)

G-CASH
text DONATEAMOUNT4-digit M-PINREDCROSS to 2882

Most urgent needs

Food items: Rice, noodles, canned goods, sugar, iodized salt, cooking oil, monggo beans and potable water

Medicines: Paracetamol, antibiotics, analgesic, oral rehydration salts, multivitamins and medications to treat diarrheal diseases

Non-food items: Bath soaps, face towels, shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, plastic mats, blankets, mosquito nets, jerry cans, water containers, water purification tablets, plastic sheetings, and Laundry soap


Erica Paredes
Katipunan Avenue, QC
0917-4741930
donate bread, packed juice, sandwich filling or you can help her team distribute the goods

Junior Chamber International Manila
Baypark Tent, Roxas Blvd.
will accept goods starting Monday

Our Lady of Pentecost Parish
12 F. Dela Rosa corner C. Salvador Sts., Loyola Heights, Quezon City
(+632-4342397, +632-9290665)
will accept relief goods

Kapuso Foundation
2/F GMA Kapuso Center
Samar St. cor. 11th Jamboree St. Diliman, Quezon City
Call 9827777 loc. 9901/9904/9905.
accepts relief goods and cash

Sagip Kapamilya
ABS-CBN Warehouse
13 Examiner St
will accept donation goods

Miriam Quiambao
One Orchard Road Bldg, Eastwood City
will accept donations starting Monday

Operation Rainbow
Ayala Alabang Village
4687991
Accepts Canned Goods, Ready-To-Eat Food, Bottled Water, Ready-To-Drink Milk/ Juice, Clothing, Blankets

Monique Villonco
Whitespace 2314 Chino Roces Ave Ext
will accept relief goods in behalf of NoyMar volunteers

Karen Ang
3 Kagandahan corner Kabutihan Streets, Kawilihan Village, Pasig
0920-9520900
will forward donated relief goods to Red Cross

Every Nation, FORT
32nd St cor University Pkwy across Market Market
will accept donations for Red Cross esp. purified water, canned goods, and infant formula

CDRC
72-A Times St., West Triangle, QC.
9299820/22
will accept relief goods

Manor Superclub, Eastwood City
will accept goods and other emergency items starting Sunday at 10 am

All Petron branches
will accept relief goods

La Salle Greenhills
Drop off goods at Gate 2

Ateneo
Drop off goods at the MVP Lobby

Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan Task Force Noah
Ateneo Cervini Dorm

Caritas Manila Office, Pandaca, MANILA
accepts relief goods esp. milk, dry clothes, food

Philippine Army Gym
Fort Bonifacio
accepts relief goods

Camp Aguinaldo
CRS Office, Camp Aguinaldo, Quezon City
0915-1162853
will accept food, medicines, and other relief items

Radio Veritas
Veritas Tower West Ave. Corner EDSA
9257931-40
accepts relief goods

Hillsborough Village chapel in ALABANG
Water, blankets, shoes, and clothes etc. are being accepted at the Hillsborough Village chapel for families whose houses were washed out in the nearby sitios.

LUCA store
Rockwell, Eastwood, Shangri-la
will accept relief goods

Myron’s
Greenbelt
will accept relief goods

Papemelroti Stores
will accept relief goods (canned goods / milk / bottled water / clothes – NO CASH)
91 Roces Ave. / Ali Mall Cubao / SM City North EDSA / SM Fairview / SM Megamall / Glorietta 3 in Makati /… SM Centerpoint / SM Southmall

Aranaz Stores (for Payatas communities)
Rockwell and Greenbelt
will accept donations

MOONSHINE
Powerplant Mall, Rockwell
will accept relief goods

Balay Expo Center across Farmers Market Cubao (NoyMar Volunteers)
will accept relief donations as well as volunteers

Office of Congressman Ruffy Biazon
Ground Flr South Center Tower, Madrigal Business Park Alabang.

Team Manila
Trinoma, Mall of Asia, Jupiter Bel-Air and Rockwell
shall be accepting relief goods for distribution by Veritas

Luzon Relief
Renaissance Fitness Center
2nd Floor, Bramante Building, Renaissance Towers Ortigas, Meralco Avenue, Pasig City
Contact Person: Warren Habaluyas, (0929) 871 3488, luzonrelief@gmail.com
Relief goods will be accepted

TXTPower.org
will forward donations to Red Cross
Paypal
Smart Money – 5577-5144-1866-7103
G-Cash – 0917-9751092

 

Stanford's Pilipino American Student Union (PASU) is also collecting donations to be sent to the Philippines to help victims of Tropical Storm Ketsana. If you would like to make a donation or help in any way, please contact AV David at avhdavid@stanford.edu or (650) 491-4561.

For more news about the typhoon: 
Philippine storm leaves 106 dead and missing
Dozens dead as flooding engulfs Manila
Philippines battles flood chaos 

Posted: 9/25/2009 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 140 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

 

Hello Villagers,

Thank you for your support as we develop East Villagers to best meet your needs as passionate volunteers and nonprofits.  We've undergone a lot of exciting news and updates.  In this September issue, you'll find all the updates and news happening in the village.  We hope you'll sign online, earn more points, and get ready to donate them to your favorite nonprofit organizations the week of November 19th.  Top 15 organizations will be announced on Thanksgiving (Nov. 26th).

Connecting thru Service,

EV Team

 

- East Villagers Community News -

1. Root International Peace Corps and Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation exceeded fundraising goal of $100,000 in support of Taiwan Typhoon Morakot Relief efforts and sets new goal of $150,000. We encourage individuals, communities, and associations to donate and support Typhoon Relief to help us meet our new goal of raising $150,000 by September 28, 2009 deadline. Read more...

2. Root International Peace Corps receives a total of $250,000 donation from Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and HP employees in support of Taiwan Typhoon Morakot Relief Efforts.  Read more...

3. Birdie for ALL, Grace Chen, 8-year-old junior world championship golfer, fundraised $3000 for Leukemia research.  Matching funds of $1500 by Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation. Read more...

4. Asian Liver Center at Stanford University's 1st Annual TeamHBV Collegiate Conference, sponsored by the Chao Foundation, will be on November 13-15, 2009. Conference is open to the public by invitation only.  Watch the conference live streamed on East Villagers.  EV/TeamHBV will be hosting many fun contests with lots of prizes. Please email groopman@stanford.edu to register.  Read more...

5. Project Little Red Scarf performed successful surgeries for 86 children with congenital heart disease. Surgery cost per child is around $4000 or more. $30 USD can provide needed nutrition for one child for a month following heart surgery. Read more...

 

- East Villagers Beta v.3.0 Updates -

1. New EV Store with many neat items you can purchase with your points.  Be the first 25 to get the EV Tshirt for 1/2 off.  (1500 pts)  If your nonprofit has an item you'd like to sell, EV can add it to the store for 0% transaction fee.  All proceeds will support your organization.

2. Twitter is now fully integrated with East Villagers.  EastVillagers is now added to every tweet made from East Villagers. You can connect your NGO's twitter and update your twitter right from your organization page.  You can also connect your twitter to your personal profile and update your twitter from EV, which will update your EV status. 

3.  New Video Tool which allows video from all providers (Youtube, Vimeo, Youku, Tudou, etc...), and it also allows you to directly upload your video onto EV.

4. Brand new Linking Interface for all linking on EV (Blogs, Projects, Organizations, and Opportunities).  Easy to add button to link your NGO website to NGO EV page.

5. EV Forum to facilitate discussion among EV members about projects, ideas, issues, questions/feedback.  Check it out!

6. EV Ticketing and Registration - If you have an event, let EV take care of your ticketing for free.

Login now to see all the updates! www.eastvillagers.org

 

Congratulations to September's Thanksgiving Point Leaders

Nancy Nguyen

Alena Groopman

Teddy Shih

Elisabeth Sum

Ping Chao

Irene Byun

Jean Yu

Brian Cheng

Peter Nguyen

Meredith Bergin

 

Posted: 9/5/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 123 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

For Immediate Release

ROOT INTERNATIONAL PEACE CORPS RECEIVES A TOTAL OF NT$10 MILLION DONATION FROM HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY FOUNDATION AND HP EMPLOYEES IN SUPPORT OF TAIWAN TYPHOON MORAKOT RELIEF EFFORTS

TAIPEI, Taiwan – September 3, 2009 –


Root International Peace Corps (RIPC 美國路竹會), a US-based, non-profit disaster relief organization, is pleased to announce that it has received a NT$10 million donation from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and the employees of Hewlett-Packard Company in support of ongoing relief efforts related to Taiwan Typhoon Morakot.

RIPC will use the donated funds through joint relief efforts to provide medical aid and supplies in partnership with its sister organization Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps (TRMPC 臺灣路竹會), a 15-year old Taiwan-based non-profit that is widely considered the A-team in medical and disaster relief. Over the years, the TRMPC has mobilized over 6,000 volunteers and is known for being the first onsite in over 25 countries across 200 missions that have so far touched over 100,000 lives.

“We would like to extend our deepest gratitude to the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and the employees of Hewlett-Packard Company for providing us with such a generous grant to address the enormous challenge of providing medical care and equipment to those affected by Typhoon Morakot,” said RIPC and TRMPC President Dr. Chi-Chun Liu.  “Their commitment to our typhoon relief efforts is truly an exemplary model of businesses caring for communities in crisis, and their contributions provide a huge boost in both resources and morale that will allow us to extend our relief efforts to many more lives and their critical needs.”
 
For those wishing to learn more about this important cause, donation information and timely updates about the relief mission can be found at RIPC’s online non-profit community and fundraising host www.eastvillagers.org, or at the TRMPC website www.taiwanroot.org.

 
About TRMPC and RIPC

Founded in 1995 through the vision of Dr. Chi-Chun Liu, Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps. (TRMPC 臺灣路竹會) believes that medical service should transcend national borders and exceed the limitations of politics, race, and religion. It holds as its end goal a united international community working in cooperation to bring about equitable access of healthcare to all populations. Since then, TRMPC has extended its services to include disaster relief, humanitarian aid, public health education and development. In 2007, Root International Peace Corps. (RIPC 美國路竹會) was founded in the US as a sister organization of TRMPC to provide services in response to increasing needs across the globe. Over the years, TRMPC has mobilized over 6000 volunteers. Its 197 missions so far have touched over 100,000 lives from high mountains of Taiwan to 25 countries across Africa, South and Central Asia, South America, Eastern Europe and South Pacific. More information about RIPC and TRMPC is available at www.ripcusa.org and http://www.taiwanroot.org.

For More Information Please Contact:

U.S.
Ping Chao
RIPC
408-316-3551
admin@eastvillagers.org   

Taiwan
Dr. Chi-Chun Liu
RIPC and TRMPC
886-2-86676700
tradm@taiwanroot.org
 


 

美國路竹會收到HP基金會及HP員工 台幣一千萬元莫拉克颱風賑災善款

 

美國加州 PALO ALTO市及台灣同時發佈 --  2009年9月3號

 


美國路竹會 (RIPC) ,為美國之非營利救援組織,今日宣布該組織收到美國HP基金會及HP員工所認捐之台幣一千萬元莫拉克颱風賑災善款。


美國路竹會(RIPC)將透過與台灣路竹會(TRMPC)的合作將此筆賑災善款用於提供莫拉克颱風災民的醫療援助及賑災資源上。台灣路竹會是美國路竹會的姊妹組織,成立迄今15年,被公認為一優秀的台灣非營利醫療災難救援組織。台灣路竹會曾動員超過6,000名志工在災後第一時間趕到災區,救援行動遍及25個國家,出動200次任務,截至目前為止,救援人數已超過100,000人。


“我們衷心感謝HP此次為提供莫拉克颱風災民的醫療照顧及設備慷慨解囊。” RIPC及 TRMPC會長劉啟群說,“HP承諾捐款賑災足以為企業回饋受災鄉里的表率。對這次救援行動,無論在資源及士氣都是大大的鼓舞,讓我們可以為更多災民的需求提供更多的援助。”

如果你想更瞭解此次賑災的重要任務,捐款及救援任務最新消息,請上美國路竹會的網路非營利社區及募款平台 www.eastvillagers.org 或台灣路竹會網站 www.taiwanroot.org

Posted: 9/5/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 124 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]

For Immediate Release

 

ROOT INTERNATIONAL PEACE CORPS AND CHAO FAMILY FOUNDATION EXCEEDED FUNDRAISING GOAL OF $100,000 IN SUPPORT OF TAIWAN TYPHOON MORAKOT RELIEF EFFORTS AND SETS NEW GOAL OF $150,000
To continue the relief efforts, we encourage individuals, communities, and associations to donate and support Typhoon Relief to help us meet our new goal of raising $150,000.

PALO ALTO, California – September 3, 2009


Root International Peace Corps (RIPC 美國路竹會), a US-based, non-profit disaster relief organization, and the Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation (趙修平夫婦基金會) are pleased to announce that they have collaboratively fundraised over $100,000 in donations from the community all across North America and individuals in support of ongoing relief efforts related to Taiwan Typhoon Morakot. Due to overwhelming need overseas, we have decided to raise the new target to $150,000. Chao Foundation pledges to match funds to meet the new goal of $150,000. We encourage individuals, communities, and associations from all across the world to unite in helping Typhoon Morakot victims and restoration.

Chinese and Asian communities across North America had responded to this crisis with overwhelming support. A successful August 23 fundraising event co-hosted by World Journal and San Francisco Chinese Business Association raised $40,000 plus $40,000 matching fund from Chao Foundation. Chao Foundation’s dollar-for-a-dollar matching program also helped raise over $21,000 so far on the internet non-profit online community www.eastvillagers.org.

RIPC and Chao Foundation will use the donated funds through joint relief efforts to provide medical aid and supplies in partnership with its sister organization Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps (TRMPC 臺灣路竹會), a 15-year old Taiwan-based non-profit that is widely considered the A-team in medical and disaster relief. Over the years, the TRMPC has mobilized over 6,000 volunteers and is known for being the first onsite in over 25 countries across 200 missions that have so far touched over 100,000 lives.

 “We would like to extend our deepest gratitude to North American Chinese and Asian communities and individuals for your generous donations and support to address the enormous challenge of providing medical care and equipment to those affected by Typhoon Morakot,” said RIPC and TRMPC President Dr. Chi-Chun Liu.

“Chao Foundation feels privileged to partner with so many individual donors in support of Typhoon relief efforts. Regardless if it’s ten dollars or thousands of dollars, Dr. Liu and I will make sure that every dollar donated through TRMPC/RIPC will be put to best use for Typhoon relief,” said Ping Chao, chairman and founder of Chao Foundation. “Our online fundraising and matching program raised over $21,000 within merely two weeks. More importantly, with the help of non-profit online community www.eastvillagers.org, we literally brought together a diverse group of people from all across U.S. and Canada, young and not-so-young, Chinese speaking and non as one community behind this important cause. That’s just incredible.”

For those wishing to learn more about this important cause, donation information and timely updates about the relief mission can be found at the Chao Foundation and RIPC’s online non-profit community and fundraising host www.eastvillagers.org.  Here is the Chao Foundation website www.chaofoundation.org and RIPC website www.ripcusa.org.


About RIPC and RIPC

In 2007, Root International Peace Corps (RIPC 美國路竹會) was founded in the US as a sister organization of Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps (TRMPC 臺灣路竹會) to provide services in response to increasing needs across the globe. Over the years, TRMPC has mobilized over 6000 volunteers. Its 197 missions so far have touched over 100,000 lives from high mountains of Taiwan to 25 countries across Africa, South and Central Asia, South America, Eastern Europe and South Pacific. Founded in 1995 through the vision of Dr. Chi-Chun Liu, TRMPC believes that medical service should transcend national borders and exceed the limitations of politics, race, and religion. It holds as its end goal a united international community working in cooperation to bring about equitable access of healthcare to all populations. Since then, TRMPC has extended its services to include disaster relief, humanitarian aid, public health education and development. More information about RIPC and TRMPC is available at www.ripcusa.org and www.taiwanroot.org.

About Chao Foundation

The Ping and Amy Chao Family Foundation (趙修平夫婦基金會) was founded in California’s Silicon Valley in 2005 by Ping Chao and his wife Amy Chao. It was established exclusively for charitable purposes. The foundation aims to fund and nurture initiatives improving the health and well-being of children and youth in economically disadvantaged regions throughout the world; promoting the spirit of philanthropy and developing awareness of non-profit practices and opportunities for service for the younger generation of China and the greater Chinese Diaspora. More information about the Chao Foundation is available at www.chaofoundation.org.


For More Information Please Contact:


U.S.
Ping Chao
Chao Foundation and Root International Peace Corps
408-316-3551
admin@eastvillagers.org

Taiwan
Dr. Chi-Chun Liu
Taiwan Root Medical Peace Corps
886-2-86676700
tradm@taiwanroot.org

 


美國路竹會及趙修平夫婦基金會
已為莫拉克颱風賑災籌得美金十萬元
-- 新目標推至美金十五萬元 --



美國加州 Palo Alto市及台灣同時發佈 --  2009年9月3號

美國路竹會(RIPC, 美國之非營利救援組織) 及 趙修平夫婦基金會 今日宣布 在兩會共同努力下,為莫拉克颱風賑災,收到美加地區 各社團及個人捐款 共十萬美元。隨著時間的推進及對災情的更多瞭解,兩會決定把目標推高到十五萬美元,以供需求。趙修平夫婦基金會仍維持對等追加捐款方式,鼓勵 全世界任何個人及社團共襄盛舉。

莫拉克颱風造成的傷害,無與倫比。而緊急救援行動, 在投入大量人力時, 需要財力支援。 兩會在北美洲展開連續籌款活動,穫得各方熱烈響應。 八月二十三日又與世界日報及舊金山中華企業協會合作, 進行賑災勸募。當日捐得四萬美元,趙修平夫婦基金會即時對等追加四萬美元。 同時,趙修平夫婦基金會 以同樣的對等追加捐款方式, 經由 東村族( www.eastvillagers.org 網路非營利社區) 鼓勵電腦連線捐款。到發稿為止, 東村族賑災募款平台的捐款總數已超過二萬一千美元。
  
兩會將賑災善款透過 台灣路竹會(TRMPC)用於提供災民的醫療援助及賑災資源上。台灣路竹會是美國路竹會的姊妹組織,成立迄今15年,被公認為一優秀的台灣非營利醫療災難救援組織。台灣路竹會曾動員超過6,000名志工在災後第一時間趕到災區,救援行動遍及25個國家,出動200次任務,截至目前為止,救援人數已超過100,000人。
 
路竹會會長劉啟群醫師說, “我們衷心感謝北美洲所有的社團和個人為提供災民的醫療照顧及設備慷慨解囊。這次救援行動,挑戰性比以往都高。 你們的愛心﹐無論在資源及士氣上,都是很大的鼓勵,讓我們可以為更多災民的需求提供更多的援助。”

趙修平說,“這幾週來 與這麼多的捐款善士併肩努力,非常感動。我與路竹會劉會長一定會把每一分毫捐款 ,充分並且及時運用到救災任務。此外,電腦連線捐款在頭兩週內就達到兩萬一千美元,達成原定的兩萬美元目標。東村族 www.eastvillagers.org 協助的賑災募款平台,把分布在美加廣大地區的有心人牽到一起。不分老少,地域,國籍,語言,每個人都無私的投入了愛心。這是始料未及的。”

如果你想更瞭解此次賑災的任務,捐款及救援最新消息,請上非營利社區及募款平台 www.eastvillagers.org 或台灣路竹會網站 www.taiwanroot.org

Posted: 9/2/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

RIPC and Chao Foundation wants to thank all donors (corporations, individuals, organizations) for your generous donations and support of the Typhoon Morakot Relief.  Our original fundraising goal was $20,000, and in less than a month, we have exceeded that goal.

 

Due to overwhelming need overseas to provide relief for typhoon victims and restoration projects, we have decided to raise the new target to $50,000. Chao Foundation pledges to match funds to meet the new goal of $50,000.

 

We encourage individuals, communities, and associations from all across the world to unite in helping Typhoon Morakot victims and restoration. Please check www.eastvillagers.org for timely updates.

Posted: 1/9/2009 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
- 121 trackback(s) [ Trackback ]
Category: Project Story

Via RealTravel

April 3 – 17th

Short term team with International China Concern

Heng Yang Welfare Centre

None of us really knew what to expect from our short term team project at the orphanage in Heng Yang. We just knew that we would be working together with a team of 26 people from many different nations all having traveled here to this very un-touristy spot of China to work with about 100 physically and or mentally disabled children and some adults. We knew that it was to be our job to play with them and love them; these residents whose lives had been utterly starved of not only play and love, but also some of their more basic needs such as food and adequate physical care, until a year ago when ICC took over the management of their home. Our first tour of the Centre was sobering. The conditions seem appalling by western standard, especially the boys’ quarters. Peeling paint on bare concrete walls and floors. Very cramped quarters. A smelly trench in the ground for a toilet. Very cramped quarters with way too many children in small rooms. No toys. Old, derelict wheelchairs. Yet, we found out, this was a HUGE improvement to what the conditions were like a year ago when ICC was invited by the Heng Yang government to take over management of the place. The girls had been moved out of the quarters now only occupied by the boys and were in newly renovated flats up the hill. The behaviour of the girls and the boys reportedly improved dramatically once this separation occurred. All the children now receive adequate, even abundant, food and eat in mannerly fashion seated around tables rather than eating out of buckets or off the dirt floor in a free-for-all race of whoever can get to the food the fastest . People on our team who had seen the centre a year ago said that they couldn’t believe the difference. Six full time staff members of ICC, a much increased number of carers, teams of volunteers, and donations of financial resources by people from all over the world have given the children hope and opportunities that would have been impossible 2 years ago. God’s plans for these children are being realized and we were so privileged to witness that and to be part of that for a short two weeks. Out of respect for the wishes of the Welfare Centre we unfortunately can not share pictures of these delightful children with you, but would like to introduce a few of those that captured our hearts.

Our mode of transportation to and from the orphanage from our hotel
Our mode of transportation to and from the orphanage from our hotel
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Steffi’s report

Working in the Heng Yang Welfare Center was a real blessing to my heart. The babies I worked with were little bundles of joy just waiting to be cuddled and loved. Getting a giggle out of a baby who usually never smiled or making eye contact with some of the babies was a challenge but was not impossible. “For nothing is impossible with God.” I worked in a room with 7 babies. The room was about 8 feet by 10 feet and the cribs were all squished together. I worked in there with one other lady and we were definitely on good terms with the carers, all six of them. I loved all of the babies in the room, but two are described down below;

Typical breakfast fare for students
Typical breakfast fare for students
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Y.Y. is an 11 month old dwarf and is one of the cutest babies in the world. (I have quite a few favourite babies.) She has a tiny, tiny body the size a 2 month old baby and she has a head a big as a 10 month old baby. Floppy arms and legs made her difficult to carry. The challenge of keeping her happy was not really a problem. She never complained and never smiled and was always so serious. I worked with her for 9 days straight cuddling and playing with her. On the last day she gave me the most fabulous moment out of all the 9 days I worked with her. A tremendously loud laugh was what burst out of her 30 minutes before I left. I am glad that I got a happy face from her to remember her by.

Water chestnut vendor on the streets of Heng Yang
Water chestnut vendor on the streets of Heng Yang
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Y. M. is one year old. She probably has autism and never makes eye contact. Walking in her walker was no problem for her but without that support she could not stand. After 2 days of holding onto her while walking about, she got the hang of it and gained a little balance. By the fourth day she could stand on her own and did a little bit of tipsy walking by herself. A couple days after that she found out that is was fun to kick a little ball around while walking. Getting a smile out of her was a little hard, but once in a while she would smile briefly when I picked her up. I will remember her for her squirminess.

Cute kids in front of the Returning Goose Temple
Cute kids in front of the Returning Goose Temple
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Karsten’s report

I really loved working with the younger boys. All of them are special in God’s eye and all of them are different. I will mention two of my favorite boys that I worked with.

To begin with there is a guy in a wheelchair and we all call him Jackie Chan. I have no idea why but everybody calls him that because we don’t know his real name. He is very quiet and it is sometimes hard to find out what he wants to play with. He points to very small little things that are on the floor that nobody else would care about. He wants me to pick them up for him so that he can put them in his pocket. Sometimes I will give him the wrong thing and he will throw it somewhere else and persists until I give him the right thing. I also really enjoyed taking him on walks in his wheelchair and we can actually communicate quite well despite our language barriers. He will point his finger in the direction he wants to go or also will wheel his chair in the direction he wants to go. I have found out that he likes the chickens that are up the hill where we go for our daily walk. I just loved pushing the kids in their wheelchairs or in there strollers. I will never forget that.

Street scene in front of our hotel
Street scene in front of our hotel
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I also really like this other no named kid but I call him Numbers Boy because he loves writing numbers down on paper. He will write numbers from one to ten or sometimes he will write just the number two on one whole piece of paper or just the number 3 on one whole piece of paper. Every time he has done one number he will show me and he will be very happy. He also is the enemy because he will go and terrorizes the older boys’ room and also bothers Dad and his team. But I will never forget his smile and his laugh.

Barb’s experience

It’s my opinion that I had the best group to work with; the ‘older girls’, meaning those between the ages of 10 and 35. Our group was housed in two flats next to the flat of ‘young girls’, ages 6 to 10, and so our groups flowed and intermingled with each other throughout the day. The weather was nice enough to set up craft tables outside and we spent the entire day outside cutting, pasting, gluing, playing with pegboards, blowing bubbles, making fancy hairdos (the more hair accessories, the better!), putting on nail polish, singing songs, or playing games. As girls do all over the globe, these girls had an endless appetite and energy for such activities. The more activities, the better!

Over the 2 weeks that we were at the Center, I was privileged to get to know some of the girls quite well and humbled to see the way they interacted with one another. Certainly, we did have daily skirmishes and bursts of emotions (?PMS) between them, but I also witnessed caring and acceptance that often brought a lump to my throat and tears to my eyes. One day I was feeding a young girl (she never spoke but had the sweetest smile) who couldn’t feed herself because of a bandaged hand. Next to this girl another young lady with severe CP was feeding herself laboriously and somewhat messily. My little friend noticed that the young lady beside her was trying to spit out a fishbone but the fishbone was stuck on her lip. Without any fuss my little charge reached over with her good hand and calmly picked the bone from her neighbor’s lips, shook it off to the ground and returned her gaze to me for further help in eating herself. For these girls helping each other in the very basics of living life is just a normal part of the day. Another time, I witnessed one of the teen girls with severe mental challenges expertly changing the diaper of a 6 year old girl with Down’s syndrome. She smiled proudly as she saw my ‘thumbs up’ to her but again it really was just a normal part of the day.

One of the best days we spent with the girls was the day we took them on an outing by hired bus to a city park. Their excitement on the day before when we told them was so great I couldn’t tell if some of them were crying or laughing. These girls get probably a maximum of 2 outings a year and what a special event it is for them! They were dressed and ready to go when we picked them up at 9:00 am, their hair adorned with many colorful barrettes and ribbons. With much excitement and effort we boarded the bus and departed. Then about 200 meters down the road, one worker’s cell phone rang; we had forgotten one of the girls! Our bus slowly backed up the narrow dirt road, and there was great cheering when the poor girl boarded. She collapsed on her seat and immediately burst into tears of relief. Post traumatic stress syndrome! All went well after that emotional start and we had a fabulous day with rides and snacks and lots of passerby stopping to stare. A group of westerners together with a group of handicapped kids – what a spectacle for the citizens of Heng Yang to rarely get to see either. We were touched at the many positive remarks we received, however. One lady on crutches even gave us a 100 Yuen donation for the children, saying with tears in her eyes, how wonderful it was to see these children having a good time. The disabled in China have traditionally been hidden away and disposed of. It is our hope that acceptance and caring is happening even here. Certainly, it has increased greatly in me. I feel that it is I who has learnt the best lessons.

David’s Experience

YHL was a tremendous mess when we first met – his face was covered all over with self-inflicted scratches. As was explained to me by Leisel the ICC volunteer working with the older boys, this was one of his ways of getting attention along with other negative activities such as pulling down his pants and urinating on the floor of their complex. It seems any attention whether positive or negative would do for him. Somehow out of the team of 4 (Martyn, Victoria, and Ruth of the Chapple family and myself) assigned to working with the older boys, I ended up spending the most time with YHL. The first couple of days at the orphanage was tremendously difficult for me as I spent most the days chasing after YHL to either shoo him towards the bathroom or to stop him from picking his facial scars. This seemed to please him, as evidenced by the smile on his face, as he got more attention than he was used to.

My fortunes with YHL changed for the better when I spoke with Stuart, a behavioral specialist with disabled children who just happened to be in from the UK to instruct the ICC staff on behavioral management of the children. He explained that I needed to stop reinforcing YHL’s negative behavior by ignoring them even if they were difficult to ignore. Over the next few days, I turned away from YHL whenever he started to pick the scabs on his face or when he started to pull down his pants. He quickly learned that these behaviors did not get him any more attention and these two negative behaviors slowly waned. Instead, I focused on his positive traits and commended him on them. He slowly learned that this provided him with more attention and his behavior changed for the better. His facial scabs slowly healed over the next 2 weeks and his behavior with me and with others improved to the point that he voluntarily helped another boy to look for lost chess pieces that were scattered all over the tall grass by another boy. What a blessing for me to have witness this miraculous change in just 2 weeks time. The lesson for me is that I need to reinforce the positive behaviors of others more and to sometimes ignore negative behavior if I am to positively influence others.

Another lesson for me is that I cannot judge a book by its cover. Many of the boys are severely physically disabled with CP or other birth defects. I learned that the minds of some of these boys were more than capable; it is only their physical body that is handicapped. For example, CS who has severe CP ambled up to me on the second day that we were there with 2 pencils and paper in hand. The paper had 4 lines on it segmenting the page into 9 boxes. He with great difficulty drew a circle in the middle box and then handed me one of his 2 pencils. At first, I did not comprehend what he was trying to convey but I soon learned that he wanted to play X’s and O’s with me. I also learned that he was a master at it and I better have my wits about me. His strategies were excellent and he won his share of games. Another example is FL who is in his twenties and was born with almost no legs. He spends most of his days squatting or sitting in the outdoor square with others in his age group. The ICC staff is training him to be their maintenance and repair person. FL and I repaired several wheelchairs while we were there. He quickly learned how to patch tire tubes and to change over flat tires on the wheelchairs. I learned that FL is very proud, very independent and very spirited despite his disabilities. He always wanted to do things on his own after he had observed once on how it should be done.

Before arriving in Heng Yang, my expectations were to help and assist others less fortunate than myself. I left having learned much about myself and about the power of the human spirit. I also learned from these kids and young adults on how to love one another despite differences. I observe how they have friends (and yes even enemies) just like we do and how despite their shortcomings, they help each other out the best that they can. Those who can walk push others in wheelchairs; those who can speak, speak for those who cannot; those who are more capable help those who are less capable; those who have more food give to those who have less. Observing these behaviors made me realize how self-centered we can be sometimes. I hope I can learn to be as generous and loving as some of these lovely children and young adults.