Posted: 12/11/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Wow, I felt super productive today. I found a nice photo, then go found my article right after. Then, I had to stamp a hundred envelopes perfectly. Yes, a hundred. It was actually pretty cool though since I learned how they made their custom envelopes — I always thought that they ordered the custom envelopes. After that, I went onto the Tfish website and uploaded a couple new blog posts. I haven’t worked with the Tfish website for a while so that was a good refresher. Meanwhile, Steve went to Burger Town and got the their awesome seasoned fries. Oh, the Burger Town memories from sixth grade. I’m also eating the best almonds I’ve ever had. Honey Roasted Blue Diamond Almonds. I need to get some myself. Anyway, enough with the food, I’ll get back to posting on Tfish!

Posted: 11/16/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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I came into the office just ten minutes after I donated blood. Wow, I feel like a good person. I also worked on Tuesday, but I had to leave early because I had an x-ray to take. I still got a good amount of work done though! I picked two photos for the PhotoCon and also found an awesome video of Andrew Garfield dancing for charity. Originally, me and Emily were in charge of the Chocolate Chip Cookie fundraiser where we were going to make cookies and sell them to raise awareness, but now we’re doing pins instead! They’re actually pretty awesome, not going to lie. Nancy introduced to us our goals for our leadership project which is to raise $2000 in donations and get 2000 Facebook Likes by June 2012. I think we can do it! Just got to work hard. Steve put us in charge of two specific NGO’s to make the Donor Book for, so that will take place of the NGO ambassadorship for now. There’s so much more to look forward to this holiday season!

Posted: 11/6/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Hemophilia Home is a nonprofit established to improve the quality of life for patients with hemophilia by collecting knowledge on hemophilia and helping destitute patients.

On March 30, 2001, my little boy, Xiaofan, came into this world. We were all very happy to have such a cute boy. However, as he grew up, something strange would always occur: Xiaofan always fell down as he tried to walk. Unlike those of the other children at his age, his bruises and swelling took a much longer time to go down. At first, doctors said it was due to a capillary problem and would be fine as Xiaofan grew up. Later, though, Xiaofan complained that his ankles hurt, and when we took him to see a doctor again, he was diagnosed with chronic periostitis and required much rest. We didn’t take it seriously until 2006, when Xiaofan got a fracture that refused to heal. We took him to Jiangxi Children’s Hospital, and unfortunately, Xiaofan was diagnosed with hemophilia. Since we were not aware that Xiaofan had hemophilia during his rehabilitation period, he didn’t receive Factor VIII on time, which led to frequent bleeding. In 2011, we had to take him for synovectomy in Beijing. Xiaofan got well after the surgery, but his condition relapsed this year. Because local hospitals have no Factor VIII, we had to buy them from pharmaceutical agents with much higher costs. How we hoped we could get factors from the local hospital so that our medical insurance could afford them! We really hope national medical policies will improve so that we can have more
resources to help Xiaofan as well as other hemophilia patients.

Original Article written by Zheng Liu, translated by Shi Shi Ma, edited by US interns Lauren Kam and Ally Nguyen.

 

Posted: 11/6/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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The Star Hope Special Education Center provide special attention for children with special needs. They provide many courses to walk the children through and aim to allow the children to better interact with the community.

Among “Children of Stars”, Xiao Xuan is a boy who is isolated and called “The Lazy Sheep” or “The King of Tears”. I remember the first day Xiao Xuan came here; he cried so heavily that we couldn’t easily calm him down. After watching him cry for several months, we gradually discovered his hatred for exercise was rooted in his laziness. He would stop crying as soon as we finished training courses. Thus, we had to create various kinds of activities to help him feel good.
To be honest, Xiao Xuan was quite a smart child, just unwilling to express himself. Occasionally, he spoke a few astonishing words in class though most of the time, he remained quiet. Moreover, Xiao Xuan also sang well only when no one else stared at him. With help, he is now trying to talk with others, which is huge progress in my eyes.
Xiao Xuan is also a beneficiary of the Ocean Paradise Project and the One Foundation. The project helps with solving problems for some poor families in our center. I am sure tomorrow will be better for all “Children of Stars”!



Original Article written by HaiJuan Gao, transalted by Shi Shi Ma, edited by US interns Lauren Kam and Ally Nguyen.

Posted: 11/6/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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The Lanzhou Greenland Volunteer Center advocates being “green” ecologically and promote social welfare through their green efforts. This article is about an event that the center held recently.

On October 13th, 2012, Lanzhou Greenland Volunteer Center held the first activity of AAW this year at Lanzhou Industry College, associated with the Environment Protection Club and Roots and Shoots Group. It attracted over 100 undergraduates to participate. We gathered and enjoyed a video clip called “Growing Up With Little Elephants” and a quiz. The whole process was overseen by Zhang Feifei, the head of the Roots and Shoots Group, and was later advised and commented on by Teacher Li.


The emcee Zhang


Watching “Growing Up With Little Elephants”


The quiz


Teacher Li is commenting and giving advice


Say no to lvory products


Group picture

Brief introduction to IFAW
Established in 1969, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) is currently one of the largest animal welfare and conservation charities in the world. Our mission is "to improve the welfare of wild and domestic animals throughout the world by reducing commercial exploitation of animals, protecting wildlife habitats, and assisting animals in distress". We have actively been advocating harmonious coexistence between man and animal.

IFAW, launched its project in China in 1993, starting with the concerns about the welfare of companion animals and the Asian black bear. Then, through the protection of the Tibetan antelope, elk, black-necked cranes, harbor seals, tigers and other animals, we gradually expanded the project and its impact in China. IFAW, with all levels of government departments and non-governmental organizations, will always focus on the protection of wildlife and companion animals, and publicity of the concept of the Ethical Treatment of Animals, as well as advocating the establishment of a civilized society for people and animals to live in harmony.

The yearly Animal Action Week (AAW) has been organized in 15 countries and held for 20 years. The main audience is young people. Lanzhou Greenland Volunteer Center began to hold this activity in Gansu in 2005, attracting an average of 45 universities or primary and secondary schools to attend yearly.

Original Article written by Jie Li, translated by Shi Shi Ma, edited by US interns Lauren Kam and Ally Nguyen.

 

Posted: 10/19/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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 Today was a very short day at the office. I came in at 3 and started editing NGO blog posts. I also found a SUPER cute picture of a little boy. At first, it was hard to tell if it was a male or female, but after doing some research and using my awesome Chinese skills, I figured out that it was a man. Emily and I also planned some top secret events for the future, so be ready for awesome new updates soon!

Posted: 10/12/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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I started exactly eleven months from today! Dang, it did not felt like I’ve been here longer since we’ve all grown so comfortable with each other so fast. I definitely improved a lot since when I first started—back then I was clueless on what to do half the time, now I know exactly what I have to accomplish. On Tuesday, I got to drive to Walgreens to pick up envelopes for Nancy. That was a pretty cool experience since I haven’t done any work outside of the office before. I’ve also been working with Emily on the Chocolate Fundraiser. As of now, we only have the blueprint down and we’ll get logistics and specifics down soon. Recently, I’ve had a lot of baking adventures with my friends so I’m glad I’ll be able to put what I’ve learned to good use! Oh, sad news. All my pictures from my previous East Villagers blog posts have been deleted for some reason! This is not good, but now I’ve learned to backup and be more secure about where to store my photos. Hmm, what else. Ah, I also really like the photo contest that we’re doing this year! Inspirational pictures are good to remembered so we’ll have a huge whiteboard full of them. And I’ll also be getting to utilize my hipster Instagram skills heheh.
 

Posted: 10/12/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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The nonprofit "Light of Love", is a volunteer group established in 2008 by students in China Pharmaceutical University. The group aims to develop health education in rural areas in Western China to teach people to safely use medicine.

Recently, we initiated a program on weibo to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival with Senior Citizens. I am glad that I took part in the program because I ended up having a great time with Grandma Sha and her family members.

On mid-autumn’s day, we visited ndma Sha’s home and brought some fruits and mooncakes. She was very happy to see us and gave us a warm welcome into her home. There were lots of potted flowers all around her house, and Grandma Sha showed us these beautiful creatures and told us many things about them. At about five o’clock, we started to prepare for dinner. With help of another volunteer, we were able to successfully serve a fancy festival dinner.

At the beginning of the dinner, we proposed a toast to both the grandma and the grandpa; we wished them a happy festival and good health all year round. Grandma was very happy and kept telling grandpa, “Look, our grand-children made all the dishes for us!” Grandpa is a war veteran--he had a stroke once, so he has trouble with speaking clearly and walking steadily. Nevertheless, we were still all glad to see their smiles. It was truly a treasurable time for everyone!

After dinner, we cleared away the dishes and had a nice conversation with Grandma until it got late. Grandma and Grandpa were tired and both needed rest, so we said goodbye to them and promised that we would visit them later.

On the way back home, we talked about family reunion and realized that no matter how far we are from home, our family shall never be forgotten.


Original Article written by Chao Li, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Kevin Mo and Isabel Auyeung.

 

Posted: 10/10/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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The nonprofit "Light of Love", is a volunteer group established in 2008 by students in China Pharmaceutical University. The group aims to develop health education in rural areas in Western China to teach people to safely use medicine.

The beautiful fall weather welcomes new students along with crunchy leaves, and our free lunch program also begins to serve them now! Due to important business in and out of school in the beginning of new term, we are sorry for the delay of our following report.

As the program was smoothly conducted, we organized a home-visiting led by teacher Zhao Kaihong. This time, we were concerned about a quiet girl-Zhao Yutian, who has become sluggish and cannot hand in her homework timely and properly. Her downcast condition got our attention, and we decided to go for a home-visit to help Yutian and to learn more about her family condition.


We are looking forward to seeing a better change in Yutian.


Free Lunch program of Lvtang Primary School goes on well. Here is the purchasing list of last month.


New term, new look. Thanks to all the people who are giving us help.

Original Article written by Guo Zhang, translated by Shishi Ma, edited by interns Kevin Mo and Isabel Auyeung.

Posted: 10/5/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Caidie primarily focuses on the younger children and their development. They especially want to give the disadvantaged children more opportunities for growth and train them to be independent. In this article, we learn about the Nursery Rhymes Reading Project.

It has been several years since the Nursery Rhymes Reading Project was initiated. At the end of 2009, we only had four children’s folk books. Now we have authorized nearly 20 public organizations to use our books in their project sites.

We provide training courses for kindergarten teachers in Dangchang, Gansu province. At the end of May 2012, we offered a class for the students at a kindergarten training school in Hechi, Guangxi. How the class impacted the students were far beyond my expectations. Everyone was enchanted by the atmosphere as much as we were back when we were children. Since these students will be nursery school teachers in the future, we hope that they can pass down the beauty of children’s folk stories to more kids.


Teacher Yao introduced the “Fly Dreams for Every Child” and our Nursery Rhymes Reading Projects.


Teacher Yao is warmly delivering a speech about our program.


Our adorable teacher, Dingding, is giving lectures about nursery rhymes. One folk story can have more than ten kinds of gesture-expressions.


If you are interested in our books and our project, please do not hesitate to contact us: http://caidie.org/

Here are more details about our project: http://caidie.org/?page_id=1205

Original article written by FuShuai Feng, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Lauren Kam and Kevin Mo.

 

Posted: 10/5/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Xi'an Public Welfare Alliance wishes to promote a spirit of volunteerism. Many student volunteers are trained to participate in public welfare activities and social work. Here is a “Thank You” letter written to the Shanxi 109 Public Service Center.

A “Thank You” letter to Shanxi 109 Public Service Center—

Please accept our sincere gratitude to you! With your full support and careful direction, our program was able to achieve a complete success and also received praise from teachers and students.

We were deeply moved by the warm welcome from Mr. Kong and the staff when we arrived in Xi’an.

Later during the fundraising program, the staff of the 109 Public Service Center carefully detailed every step for fundraising. They also gave us permission to attend the activity, which was very helpful for our practice.

The staff voluntarily accompanied us to carry out community services and gave us very useful directions, especially during our research in Zaoyuan Tangdu Garden Community. There, they introduced us to the management staff of the community where we made an in-depth exploration with all the members. With their full support and careful explanation, we obtained lots of direct sources and experience on community services. Also, Mr. Kong Bin, the leader of the 109 center met us before we left Xi’an. He shared his views on public welfare establishments as well as undergraduates’ entrepreneurship, from which we undoubtedly benefited.
We are so grateful that the staff of the 109 center accompanied us the whole time and gave us very helpful guidance during our research in Xi’an. Our conversation with Mr. Kong made the practice even better. We could not have done this without your full support and selfless contribution that made this program so successful. Your devotion unfolded the spirit of public services, and unremittingly inspired us not to waver nor surrender. We apologize for having to express our gratitude in such a short letter, but we surely have engraved your kindness in our minds forever.
And finally, please accept our sincere thank-you’s again; we wish you all good health and great success in your work!

Best regards,

PHE Summer Social Practice Team of Sichuan Normal University, Xi’an Unit


Original Article written by Kong Bin, translated by ShiShi Ma, and edited by US interns Lauren Kam and Kevin Mo.

Posted: 10/5/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Hemophilia Home is a nonprofit established to improve the quality of life for patients with hemophilia by collecting knowledge on hemophilia and helping destitute patients. In this article, Zheng Liu tells us about Xiaoyi, a boy who is constantly fighting hemophilia.

Xiaoyi was born on June 5th, 2003. No one ever expected that there would be a tragedy after seven months of happy times. Xiaoyi injured his lips and bled heavily, so we took him to the hospital to stop it. However, he started bleeding again when his mother was feeding him. This time, things were worse. Xiaoyi was diagnosed with hemophilia so the doctor suggested that we should  bring him to the Chengdu Huaxi Hospital for further examination. The doctor also taught us more about hemophilia and we were shocked how our baby had been diagnosed with such a terrible disease.

After several months had passed, Xiaoyi’s legs began to swell and was diagnosed with hemophilia A type. Again in 2004, Xiaoyi’s legs swelled again. This time we took him to the 2nd affiliated hospital of Huaxi, and we now had to take him to the hospital twice a year. Just when we were able to pay off all the medical fees, Xiaoyi would have another stroke and we would have to take him to the hospital again.

In 2008, Xiaoyi began attending kindergarten. Even then, he would vomit anything he ate. After the radioscopy, doctor said Xiaoyi had intracranial hemorrhage, so he must transfer coagulation factor immediately. Since there were no domestic-made factors, we had to pay more for the imported ones. In order to take care of Xiaoyi, his mother had to quit her job. It was a great burden for an average family, so we had been dragged to a worse situation.

The year 2010 was an unforgettable one. On March 21st of 2010, Xiaoyi had an intracranial hemorrhage again with a seizure, and then he fell into a coma. After the two hour drive, the unconscious Xiaoyi had been sent to the emergency room. With the help of the doctors, Xiaoyi survived eventually.

Since 2011 however, Xiaoyi suffered from serious congestion in his legs and he could not stand still until  now. We made every effort to borrow money to cure the disease, but things just got worse. The whole family anchored in a dilemma: we had no money, nor efforts to face the new situation while they kept coming all the way. What should we do? When could we end this battle successfully?



Original article written by Zheng Liu, translated by ShiShi Ma, and edited by US Interns Lauren Kam and Kevin Mo.

Posted: 8/1/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

When I was seven years old, my little sister was born into this world. She was a cute baby, however, her intellectual performance were not on par with other children her same age. Though she had finally stuttered out and tottered around, neighbors still talked about my sister behind our backs, which depressed my parents. So, my parents took my little sister to hospital to check it out, but what the hospital told us totally shocked us as she was diagnosed with atelencephalia, meaning that she was retarded and would have to attend special courses at school in the future. My parents didn’t give up, and they tried to search for a cure for my sister. After 8 years of struggles, we were over 100,000 RMB (~15,700 USD) in debt, and she still showed no sign of improving. We had no chocice but to send her to a school that offered special education. It was encouraging that my sister performed quite well in this school, and we all hoped that she could grow up regularly.

 

However, things quickly changed. Just two weeks before, her father took her to see the doctor again because she wasn't doing so well in school. My heart nearly stopped when the doctor told us she was diagnosed with CHD. CHD was the last thing we wanted. My father then took us to a hospital in Lanzhou in hopes of finding the cure for my little sister. Thankfully, we met the Little Scarf Fund Charity at the hospital, and they told us their charity can cover part of operation costs. Through their help, my sister was admitted to hospital and took on an important medical check-up. The results came out five days later, but the bad news now stretched before us: it was too late for an operation, and the best solution was to take the heart-lung transplantation. My father said nothing but silently checked out from hospital. Later, my father told me that he did not wish to burden Little Scarf with anything more. When I took my sister out of the hospital, she cheerfully asked me, “Are we going home now?” Looking at her innocent face, there was no way I could expose to the cruel truth. Ignorance surely is a bliss sometimes. How I wish she could live in her simple world forever! There is no hurt or illness in her world; it is a place where all of us can live without sorrow or anxiety.

 

Original article written by Jie Yun, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US Interns Lauren Kam and Kevin Mo. 

Posted: 8/1/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 The concentric workshop is a full-time staff, volunteers and expert advisors composed of migrant children and young people (migrant) education aid team.

 

In order to get close to nature, we took art lessons from June 2-7 in Yanchi, Beijing. We took outdoor painting lessons, experienced free-climbing, and went through the fast-moving streams as we held hands. 30 children of migrant workers attended the activity.

 

Many moving stories came forth during those five days: we overcame difficulties together and actively helped each other, and we were all deeply touched by teacher Gu, the organizer of this program. He always risked his own well-being to take the lead and made our safety the first priority. Thanks to teacher Gu, many of us had the chance to feel the beauty of nature and make friends. How lucky we are to have such a great teacher!

 

We had many achievements during this trip. Over 200 sketches and paintings recall our memories of various activities, but the most precious thing was the courage that resulted in the end.

 

Teacher Gu is leading us to climb over the mountain

 

Teacher Gu is giving us advises

 

Teacher Gu is taking us go through the fast-moving streams

 

Teacher Gu is giving us a lecture

 

Original article by Gu Xiaochen, translated by Shishi Ma, and edited by US intern Ally Nguyen and Lauren Kam. 

Posted: 8/1/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas.

 

Since July, the program has been going as planned at the beginning of the year. We have achieved a great deal this month:

1.     8 people, mainly farmers, came to our counseling office with problems regarding youth education and common mental illnesses. 19 people asked for help on the Internet. Because they are mainly students, migrant workers, and those serving in the army, their problems are usually about the difficulties and pressures of studying, working, and marriage.

2.     We planned for the lecture trip, activities, and PPTs as well as other materials for activities. We mainly focused on children’s education, communication, and the prevention of common mental illnesses.

 

Here are sample PPTs I prepared

Several activities have been scheduled for next month:

1.     Attend professional training in Bejing in early August;

2.   Carry out a health knowledge contest in Xiaotang village, Xinyang, and Henan province in mid August.

3.    Hold a singing contest on Chinese Valentine’s Day in Duofu town, Sichuan province. We hope it will motivate people to attend community activities.

 

Here are some sample ads and plans for our activities

 

Original article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by Shishi Ma, and edited by US intern Ally Nguyen and Lauren Kam. 

Posted: 8/1/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Anhui Farmers' Cooperative is an organization for farmers' rights, and has undertaken several community development projects. 

 

This month, we organized a basic training, conducted the internal team building programs, and finished our routine work.

 

Invited by Bozhou Shengqiao Area League, we organized a basic training for over 40 units.

 

The site scene of our activity

 

Guest mentors of the activity

 

Because this has been an unusually hot month, it has been hard for staff members to perform their best. To ease their tiring minds and cheer them up, we had some team building activities: we went on a trip to Xihu in Yingzhou and to the movies together. These activities help us improve our relationship and recharge us with abundant energy at work.

 

Original article written by Yang Yunbiao, translated by Shishi Ma, and edited by US intern Ally Nguyen and Lauren Kam. 

Posted: 7/30/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Steve had me start off by making address stickers for the winners of the essay and art contest. I learned a couple state abbreviations during the process! Oh, and it was also the first time that I found out who won in the different categories! Making the stickers was pretty frustrating since Microsoft Word sucks, but we still managed to get the job done :] I then edited Janna’s super long but super pro translation of a LRS article. Not gonna lie, it was pretty touching so make sure you go check it out. Next, I worked on creating more sticker labels, but this time for the pamphlets that Transparent Fish fund is planning to hand out at the Jenny Lin concert. That is all for today! 

Posted: 7/30/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Little Red Scarf is an NGO that sponsors congenital heart surgeries for diseased children. The following is an extremely touching story of Cun Hua, a girl from Wu Wei, Gansu, who miraculously endured so much suffering because of her family's inability to afford surgery.  

 

At 14 years old, a child's life is supposed to be full of energy and colorful adventures. As for Cun Hua, she has been having a monotonous fourteen years—her adventures are limited to simple household chores. She sews insoles of shoes, helps her Grandma wash and cut the vegetables, and sweeps the floor. Cun Hua’s heart disease has inhibited her physical ability to play and have fun, draining her childhood of its wonder.

 

When Cun Hua was 3 months old, her parents received news that she had congenital heart disease. They were devastated; after all, she was their first child. As days passed, the parents began to feel a little more comforted as Cun Hua seemed to be growing up just fine. Other than the fact that she catches colds quite often, she was nevertheless similar to all the other children. At that time, the family's rough economic situation didn't even allow them to consider surgery as an option.

 

At 4 Years old, Cun Hua’s lips began to show symptoms of cyanosis. Whenever she ran around and played, the color of her lips and face would deepen in color as the cyanosis become more serious. Her parents could obviously notice that Cun Hua no longer had the stamina to keep up with her friends' energy. 

 

By the time Cun Hua was 6 years old, her cyanosis was too obvious. At first glance, everyone would notice that she had black lips and a dark face. The talk about her condition made her parents really worried about Cun Hua’s disease. While other kids were getting ready for school, Cun Hua's had to stay home since no school would enroll her due to her body condition. They had five mouths to feed at home. Their family owned five acres of land, but during the many years of drought they could barely scrape together enough food. Labor in the fields couldn't cover other living expenses, and the parents had to rely on other odd jobs to support the family. Because of Cun Hua’s deteriorating state along with the family’s desperate situations, the parents began to feel a lot of stress. Even just the idea of the cost for surgery still scared them. However, they knew that Cun Hua desperately needed this surgery and felt that they had to adjust their current way of life. Right now, the family's most important job was to make and save money. The parents decided to travel to the larger city in hopes of higher pay. During this time, the family didn’t have a single landline phone for communication. That same year, they left for Xinjiang for work (Chinese Turkestan). Not long after, a little brother was born with them in Xinjiang, adding yet another mouth to feed and more economic responsibility. 

 

When Cun Hua turned 8 years old, the family finally had a telephone to communicate through. But by then, Cun Hua felt distanced from her mom and dad. Her parents had become fuzzy memories from her childhood, and to Cun Hua, they were almost dispensable. 

 

Cun Hua turned 9 and her fingers started swelling; her fingertips became thickher nails becoming transparent. During this period, Cun Hua’s father was the only employed wage earner. Cun Hua’s mother stayed at home, in their rented house, caring for the little baby. The father earned about 300  yuan (about US$46) , and as rent and living expenses, now including the baby’s milk formulas, this was barely enough money, if it could cover everything at all. Even like this, every year the grandparents at home needed some money, and Cun Hua’s frequent cold medicine drained the parent’s meager income. 

 

The family was scraping every saving down to the last penny, yet the surgery fees were still unattainable. To save money, the parents decided to alternate turns every year and return home to visit. This way, one person’s traveling fees could be saved, and it could go towards buying new clothes or eating more nutritious food. Like this, Cun Hua could only meet either her mother or father once a year for a very short time. Her concept of mother and father was lost, and they were just another persons. It even felt awkward for her to call them “Father” or “Mother”. 

 

12 year old Cun Hua began wanting to go to school, thinking that it would be a good experience. But there was only room for her to envy the other kids. 

When Cun Hua was thirteen, she began to realize her congenital heart disease. She made the connection that her blue-ish purple lips and swollen fingers were symptoms of her illness. Also, the other children could help their families knead dough, but she could only mix the flour and water because she did not have the strength to knead. When she left the house, many of the village neighbors would stare at her fingers, and then discuss it for quite a while. After a while, whenever Cun Hua would walk out, she would cross her arms and hide her hands under her armpits, thinking that it was a very smart move, and that less people would notice her swollen fingers. But in fact, it attracted more attention as people tried to guess what she was hiding, and either way, her dark lips and purplish skin already gave away her disease.

 

25 days before Cun Hua’s 14th birthday, her parents finally brought out their deposit from all these years or work, and brought Cun Hua to the hospital. Her uncle had saw the LRS posters about congenital heart disease surgery relief, and made contact with out LRS staff. The first day I saw Cun Hua, even as I walked towards her from afar, I was completely taken by surprise by her appearance. I slowed my pace down in shock, studying the color of her skin and lips. I don’t know how she managed to struggle through her disease. At that time, Cun Hua and her parents had just walked out from the doctor’s office. All three people’s eyes were red from crying, and it was easy to see that the doctors’ did not foresee an optimistic chance for her with her condition already at this state. But these 14 years, even based on the distance in their relationship, the parents owe this child too much. She didn’t even want to call them “Baba, Mama”. With this feeling of guilt, the parents still wanted to give Cun Hua a chance at surgery. In all these years, the only reason why the parents had to distance themselves was to save money for her surgery. They understand their dear child’s resentment towards them. Right now, to them, the most important place to start is giving Cun Hua a healthy body, and the surgery. Only from there, can they possibly begin to eliminate the barrier and restore the love that they once had.

 

Original article translated by Janna Wang, edited by Kevin Mo.

Posted: 7/16/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Today I got an attempt at being artistic. We got help with a student project called CLOVER Project summer camp located in China. Last Wednesday, Emily and I learned a lot about this summer camp and contacted Angie and the leaders of the organization. Their camp has multiple themes and the group that we are partaking in is called “Ten Days Around the World” and we are in charge of the “Festivals” sub-category. Since their camp starts this Wednesday, we had to finish all of our artwork pieces by today, in only three hours! We focused on Christmas and each worked on a different part of the Christmas holiday to create an artwork and a blurb about the specific aspects of Christmas. I did Christmas decorations and created a shopping list of the typical items you would buy for Christmas (ie. wreaths, mistletoes, trees, ornaments, presents, etc.) and then explained the importance of each of these. I also asked the kids in the camp to create their own shopping list of what they would want to buy to decorate their homes for Spring Festival, the Chinese version of New Year’s. Can’t wait to see what they make!

Posted: 7/9/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Steve connected his computer to the TV so that we could all do some fancy big screen TV editing. It was probably one of the most thorough editing works that we have ever done, and it was the first one where all three of us worked together to make it super awesome. We then applied these couple new editing techniques and edited an old EV blog post where we made it awesome. Then, we watched a TED Talk about helping mothers in Tibet give birth, as many mothers died in the process due to unsanitary conditions and very little hospital care. I also read about the Burma Humanitarian Mission and the Helping Orphans Worldwide. There were some very strong pictures on the HOW posts, but it only made the blog posts so much more powerful.

Posted: 7/9/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

It has been nearly half a year since we had the idea to build a cultural courtyard. In the process of construction, many stories were moved. The participation of seniors and children made me feel united and warm.

 

 

Sand

Building stones

Children helped put bricks in order.

“Young as I am, I could lift up 2 bricks.”

The aged also joined the process of putting bricks in order

It could be put on concrete after we paved the place with broken bricks instead of building stones.

Agitator (it’s used to sand, cement and building stones)

Putting concrete on the ground with a handcart

We paved a quarter of the ground

Polishing machine that makes the ground smooth.

Embellishing corners

Accomplishment

It looks very different. Several days ago, an old man came to help. Unfortunately, he suddenly passed away. It was not possible for the old man to ever walk on the cement ground and see us dancing on it.

I was deeply touched by the large family. Each one in the family is so sweet.. We will remember our smiles, sweat, and songs forever.

 

Original Article written by Yunbio Yang, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Ally Nguyen and Lauren Kam. 

Posted: 7/4/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Today I was given a baby. Her name is Causes and she can already do great things. She will help publicize Transparent Fish Fund, manage fundraisers and donations, and recruit others to join her. However, there is still a process that needs to be completed since she was just born. Okay moment of truth–she’s not literally a baby (although I wish I had a baby, except not at this point in my life), but an awesome website where she will help us drive change. After getting to know Causes, I moved on and did the usual editing work and posted new blog entries onto East Villagers. Be sure to check them out, they’re definitely worth the read. Oh yeah, NANCY’S GETTING MARRIED ON SATURDAY! Wah, that is so exciting. :]

Posted: 7/4/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In this more personal blog entry, she tells us about her joys of rain. 

 

The rain lasted for 2 days in Sichuan, but I’m especially happy for 2 reasons.

First of all, we have made a magical effect in guiding children to read Di Zi Gui with their mothers.

Secondly, my husband was worried about me and is coming to see me. He promised to send me to Haotang village for women’s training when I finish my work in Sichuan.

 

Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Ally Nguyen. 

Posted: 7/4/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 

Little Red Scarf serves to provide financial means and encouragement to children suffering from congenital heart disease. In addition, they provide the family with post-operative care and help their child sustain a healthy lifestyle. In May, LRS participated in the Hui Ling Walkathon in hopes to raise awareness and acceptance of the mentally disabled community. Read the original article here.



 

 

On the morning of May 27th, Little Red Scarf participated in the 9th Hui Ling Walkathon hosted by Lanzhou Hui Ling Mental Retardation Service Center and Lanzhou Youth Entrepreneurship Culture Communication Co., Ltd. More than 2000 people from different positions, such as people with social and mental disabilities, charitable figures, government officials,  volunteers, and media reporters of nonprofit organizations and corporations showed up.

There were performances by the mentally disabled, speeches by the hosts, warm ups, and jogging.

We knew a volunteer who had had congenital heart disease and was taking part in the activities. She had an operation in Beijing when she was in 2nd grade. Now she is very optimistic and open. She was willing to be a volunteer after she knew the children whom LRS tried to help.

We also saw volunteers of Lanzhou City Qi Li River District Ling Xing Special Education Center.

Through the walkathon event, we hope to increase the integration of the mentally disabled and public community together, and raise awareness and acceptance of these vulnerable groups.

Original article by Ai Ju Chang, translated by Shishi Ma, edited by US intern Ally Nguyen, Lauren Kam, and Janna Wang.

 

Posted: 7/4/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Little Red Scarf is an NGO that sponsors congenital heart surgeries for diseased children. The following is a touching story of a child, Jiajia, who lapsed into unconsciousness after her heart surgery. To read the original story, click here

 

 

One day in May, a couple brought their child to the hospital. They finally arrived in the hospital without appearing tired, even after traveling 2 hours through narrow passes and 4 hours on mountainous roads.  The mother held her baby in her arms. The baby’s name was Jiajia.

They were familiar with the hospital because their child had been diagnosed with congenital heart disease at 4 months old there. They had been to the hospital 4 times because Jiajia had pneumonia. The doctor said Jiajia had to have an operation at once. Her father came to us and asked for help. Two weeks later, they came to the hospital waiting for an operation for their baby, which gave them hope.

 

Jiajia and her parents were waiting for the operation.

The operation went well. Then bad news came from the ICU,  that Jiajia’s heart had suddenly stopped. Her heart began to beat again with the rescue, but she lapsed into light unconsciousness. Every day, all of us expected to see Jiajia wake up. But she continued to sleep for 17 days. In order to help Jiajia wake up sooner, her mother was admitted to see Jiajia every day.

Her mother always took Jiajia’s hand in hers and said to Jiajia,  “Mommy and Daddy have come to see you, so baby, please wake up.” But it didn’t work. She was asleep and wandering in the beautiful dream. “Please wake up, many relatives are waiting for you.”

 

 

Please wake up baby, don’t make your parents and us wait too long. Because of you, your parents’ lives have become happier and happier. Please wake up, dear baby.


Original article by Guan Ying, translated by Shishi Ma, edited by US intern Ally Nguyen, Lauren Kam, and Janna Wang.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Today I stood here and thought of what we were 14 years ago. At that time there were unreasonable charges and mistaken arrests in each village. Villagers petitioned the government but were hurt instead… 

 

That was why we founded a cooperative. We never forgot the history and clearly remembered those comrades who fought with us. They are: Tang Dianlin, Tang Wanwei, Liu Junyun, Tangjin Gang, Tang Dianhua, Tang Jinfu, Zhang Wenhua, Wang Xiuhua, Tan Zixia, Dang Yongju, Zhao Keling, Yang Ganli, Jia Hongying, Zhang Yong, Wang Silin, Wang Shaocheng, Wu Shibin, Ning Kesheng, Zhang Yubin, Chen Yuying, Wang Sihai,Xu Yulong, Liu Shiguang, Liu Jianchun, Yang Baochao, Liu Xiubang, Gao Shiyou, Liu Yuxi, Liu Yulian, Zhang Jinxi, Zhang Hengqin, and Zhang Xuesheng.

 

Many of them left from the cooperative for various reasons.

 

We will never forget their great effort and struggle for rights.

 

I remembered our best honored friend Liu Laoshi and how we shared our new career as the Senior Association and Women Art Team. 

 

It was a great challenge to sing songs with smiles on our faces when we did not wipe tears from our faces.

 

Although there was no money, audio, or locations, we had passion, spirits of sacrifice, and communication at that time. That was enough for us. 

 

Senior Association and Women Art Team have never stopped since they were founded 9 years ago. Let’s remember them. they are: Xing Caiying, Luo Guilan, Shen Wen Xin, Fan Guoqing, Deng Lanying, Ning Mingying, Zhao Jinxia, Fan Jinliang, Qi Yuzhen, Shen Zhihuan, Tang Zhiting,Yu Xiuying, Lian Wenxia, Hao Xiulan, Zhang Fengying, Tang Zhitian, Zhang Shichen, Liu Xiaoying, Guo Xinghua, Xing Huazhong, Qin Xifang, Zhao Jigui, Yang Sufen, Wang Siqun, Ning Guocai, Tang Ying, Wang Sijing, Liu Guilian, Wang Sifu, Wang Sipeng, Ning Guoxi, Wu Qiying, Wu Shibin, Ren Deng Jun, Zhang Junhe, Chen Yuhai, Chen Jinshan, Chen Jinyou, Chen Yulin, Wang Yugang, Chen Zhenting, Zhang Conglan, Wang Sizhen, Zhang Shiqin, Shi Yongqin, Shi Yonglin, Han Jinliang, Shi Yongjin, Shi Yongqing, Liu Jinrong, Wang Lanying, Wang Fumin, Wang Guizhen, Yang Ganchen, Zhang Huaixia, Liu Tilan, Tan Haoqing, Yan Huafang, Yan Huafen, Han Shaoqi, Chen Jinxi, Tan Zibin, Tan Mingxin, Yu Guiying, and Liu Shiqin.

 

We remember that they created noble dignity and sounds.

 

We remember when we struggled for half a year living by 2 RMB’s (~0.31 USD) expense of each person per day 4 years ago.

 

People who paid effort for the building should be remembered. They are:

Liu Shiqin, Shi Yongjin, Zhang Yong, Zhang Yubin, Ning Guocai, Wang Sijing, Wang Sifu, Zhao Guozhi, Tang Zhiting, Liu Jinquan, Wu Shibin, and Tang Dianhua.

 

We remember when we had meetings and studied all over communities for the Heifer Plan.

 

We remember when we collected money for Yang Zhen; we raised donations for Sichuan from 11 communities.

 

We remember supervisors of funds spent time developing our cooperative with us though all of them were very busy. They are: Tang Diancheng, Zhang Junhui, Qian Wensheng, Tang Dian Lin, Zhang Guojun, Liu Fufei, Wu Huaihai, Jia Ru jun, and Shen Yongjun.

 

We remember those organizations and friends who helped us: Liu Laoshi from Beijing, Zhang Hongjun of Price Bureau, Qiuhong from Hong Kong, Director Lv of the Ministry of Finance, Liang shu-ming's township built center, James Yen Rural Reconstruction Institute, Oxfam Hong Kong, China Zigen, and Beijing Transparent Fish.

 

We have not forgotten the building finance scandal, shame of the jerry-built project, bad behavior of damaging office facilities, and rumors.

 

We will remember these lessons forever, because they are precious treasures.

 

We will never forget fights, tears, laugh, struggles, the pain, and hardships that we went through.

 

The best monument is to create our happy life in our cooperative together no matter who we are and where we are from.

 

We ask Ms. Wang to lead us to sing the cooperative song. 

 

 

Original Article written by Bin Wang, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Anhui Farmers' Cooperative is an organization for farmers' rights, and has undertaken several community development projects. Yang Yun Bao's entry is a remembrance to all those that have influenced and made a difference in the village. 

 

Today I stood here and thought of what we were 14 years ago. At that time there were unreasonable charges and mistaken arrests in each village. Villagers petitioned the government but were hurt instead… 

 

That was why we founded a cooperative. We never forgot the history and clearly remembered those comrades who fought with us. They are: Tang Dianlin, Tang Wanwei, Liu Junyun, Tangjin Gang, Tang Dianhua, Tang Jinfu, Zhang Wenhua, Wang Xiuhua, Tan Zixia, Dang Yongju, Zhao Keling, Yang Ganli, Jia Hongying, Zhang Yong, Wang Silin, Wang Shaocheng, Wu Shibin, Ning Kesheng, Zhang Yubin, Chen Yuying, Wang Sihai,Xu Yulong, Liu Shiguang, Liu Jianchun, Yang Baochao, Liu Xiubang, Gao Shiyou, Liu Yuxi, Liu Yulian, Zhang Jinxi, Zhang Hengqin, and Zhang Xuesheng.

 

Many of them left from the cooperative for various reasons.

 

We will never forget their great effort and struggle for rights.

 

I remembered our best honored friend Liu Laoshi and how we shared our new career as the Senior Association and Women Art Team. 

 

It was a great challenge to sing songs with smiles on our faces when we did not wipe tears from our faces.

 

Although there was no money, audio, or locations, we had passion, spirits of sacrifice, and communication at that time. That was enough for us. 

 

Senior Association and Women Art Team have never stopped since they were founded 9 years ago. Let’s remember them. they are: Xing Caiying, Luo Guilan, Shen Wen Xin, Fan Guoqing, Deng Lanying, Ning Mingying, Zhao Jinxia, Fan Jinliang, Qi Yuzhen, Shen Zhihuan, Tang Zhiting,Yu Xiuying, Lian Wenxia, Hao Xiulan, Zhang Fengying, Tang Zhitian, Zhang Shichen, Liu Xiaoying, Guo Xinghua, Xing Huazhong, Qin Xifang, Zhao Jigui, Yang Sufen, Wang Siqun, Ning Guocai, Tang Ying, Wang Sijing, Liu Guilian, Wang Sifu, Wang Sipeng, Ning Guoxi, Wu Qiying, Wu Shibin, Ren Deng Jun, Zhang Junhe, Chen Yuhai, Chen Jinshan, Chen Jinyou, Chen Yulin, Wang Yugang, Chen Zhenting, Zhang Conglan, Wang Sizhen, Zhang Shiqin, Shi Yongqin, Shi Yonglin, Han Jinliang, Shi Yongjin, Shi Yongqing, Liu Jinrong, Wang Lanying, Wang Fumin, Wang Guizhen, Yang Ganchen, Zhang Huaixia, Liu Tilan, Tan Haoqing, Yan Huafang, Yan Huafen, Han Shaoqi, Chen Jinxi, Tan Zibin, Tan Mingxin, Yu Guiying, and Liu Shiqin.

 

We remember that they created noble dignity and sounds.

 

We remember when we struggled for half a year living by 2 RMB’s (~0.31 USD) expense of each person per day 4 years ago.

 

People who paid effort for the building should be remembered. They are:

Liu Shiqin, Shi Yongjin, Zhang Yong, Zhang Yubin, Ning Guocai, Wang Sijing, Wang Sifu, Zhao Guozhi, Tang Zhiting, Liu Jinquan, Wu Shibin, and Tang Dianhua.

 

We remember when we had meetings and studied all over communities for the Heifer Plan.

 

We remember when we collected money for Yang Zhen; we raised donations for Sichuan from 11 communities.

 

We remember supervisors of funds spent time developing our cooperative with us though all of them were very busy. They are: Tang Diancheng, Zhang Junhui, Qian Wensheng, Tang Dian Lin, Zhang Guojun, Liu Fufei, Wu Huaihai, Jia Ru jun, and Shen Yongjun.

 

We remember those organizations and friends who helped us: Liu Laoshi from Beijing, Zhang Hongjun of Price Bureau, Qiuhong from Hong Kong, Director Lv of the Ministry of Finance, Liang shu-ming's township built center, James Yen Rural Reconstruction Institute, Oxfam Hong Kong, China Zigen, and Beijing Transparent Fish.

 

We have not forgotten the building finance scandal, shame of the jerry-built project, bad behavior of damaging office facilities, and rumors.

 

We will remember these lessons forever, because they are precious treasures.

 

We will never forget fights, tears, laugh, struggles, the pain, and hardships that we went through.

 

The best monument is to create our happy life in our cooperative together no matter who we are and where we are from.

 

We ask Ms. Wang to lead us to sing the cooperative song. 

 

Original Article written by Yang Yun Bao, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In her blog post, she writes about an encounter with a woman that has gone through so much pain and suffering. 

 

I knew a woman in a town of Sichuan Province last year when I gave lectures. She was older than 30 but still loved studying. She always followed me wherever I carried out my activities. She would bring everyone she knew that had mental problems to me. She was very glad about it but it made me feel so tired.

 

She brought her relative to me again next weekend. Her relative was a 40-year-old woman dressed in all black. I thought there was a very serious mental problem with her just from looking at her. She was very thin and looked extremely miserable. However, we managed to build a trusting relationship very quickly and she shared her painful experiences with me.

 

She had many diseases, such as chest ache, shoulder ache, stomach aches, heart aches, belly aches, and more. She was always nervous and fearful about wind, rain, dark and loneliness. She often cried about trifles and wished to divorce her husband even though her husband treated her well. She even wanted to die. She went to the  hospital with her husband. She accepted lots of checks, but the only one conclusion that the hospital gave her was that she was healthy.

 

Her friends and relatives, even her husband and children said she was narrow-minded and insatiable. Someone said she was totally healthy or was a mental disorder patient. No one could understand her. She kept on talking for over an hour and I listened to her carefully. Sometimes I stopped to clarify something. But when she finally finished, I told her that I could understand the suffering she had endured. After hearing that, her folded brow stretched for the first time. She was a typical mental disease patient.

 

The woman’s mother had cancer. She had to look after he mother by herself for more than two years. She had to help her mother eat her meals and use the restroom. She suffered a lot while her mother was ill. Her mother’s ferocious face prior to death had both scared and scarred her. But no one even cared about her after her mother had passed away.

 

Although her family brought her to see a doctor, no one could understand her and exactly how she felt. What she had suffered in the three years explained all the feelings she had. I taught her some relaxing exercises and gave her some advice. I advised her to get a new hairstyle and buy some new fresh-colored clothes for herself so that they could help get rid of disease. Finally, I hoped that she would return to me before I left. 

 

She asked me, “Why do you want to help us when you're so far from your home?”

I asked her, “Why do you think?”

She asked, “Who paid your expense?”

I said, "Mr. and Mrs. Zhao Xiuping, they support me to help you. ”

She asked, "How did you guys meet?”

I said, “I met you, it was coincidence.”

 

It was difficult for the visitor to recover from what she had suffered for 3 years. It would take some time to heal her. She should thank The Ping & Amy Chao Family Foundation. And it doesn’t matter whether she thanks me or not.

 

Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Light of Love is a student initiative that strives to improve the quality of life in rural China. More specifically, their project Loving Lunch puts their mission into practice by traveling to rural schools and providing underprivileged children with food. Wang Xu writes about the cheerful vision for the rest of the school year. 

 

This semester, our school has a "red songs, dance campus" theme.

From now on, we plan to start every semester with a few “red songs” to sing, followed with two dancing rehearsals for the whole school. 

We happily sing and dance together during our break time. 

Let us take a look at teachers and students practicing!

 

 

Original Article written by Wang Xu, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Light of Love is a student initiative that strives to improve the quality of life in rural China. More specifically, their project Loving Lunch puts their mission into practice by traveling to rural schools and providing underprivileged children with food. This short blog entry is about the June 1st event. 

 

The annual Children’s Day is coming very soon!

This is our 2nd primary school’s fun games! 

The fun games total 11 projects and combined intelligence enjoyment.

Here, we can take a look at the children’s joyful training.

 

 

Original Article written by Wang Xu, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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 Little Red Scarf Care serves to provide financial means and encouragement to children suffering from congenital heart disease. In addition, they provide the family with post-operative care and help their child sustain a healthy lifestyle. Jie Yun Yun Yu Jie writes about her experience going to different hospitals to spread the word of Little Red Scarf Care.  

 

Noon of May 14th, my colleague Guan Ying and I left for Xining City of Qinghai Province according to our work schedule. We were relieved when we arrived in railway station 10 minutes before of the train’s departure.

 

We arrived in west railway station of Xining City which is far away from downtown at 3:40 pm. We were so eager to find the two hospitals that we didn’t care about the time. With the help of Guan Ying’s classmate, we found the two hospitals, which helped our visit the next day. When the night fell, we checked into a hotel for the night. 8:15 AM the next day, we arrived in the first hospital: Cardiovascular Disease Special Hospital of Qinghai Province. Just like yesterday, there were still a lot of people.

 

We must have calculated the time wrong because when we arrived at the cardiac surgery room, the surgeon had begun another operation. There were going to be two surgeries sand they couldn't predict when the surgery would be finished. We then had to find another cardiac surgery leader in the administrative building. Someone told us that Director Zang was in charge of such matter. However, when we found Director Zang, she misunderstood us and interrupted us. Although we didn't feel too welcomed by her, we still told her that we were from the Little Red Scarf Union and specially assisted CHD children in powerful hospitals.

 

 

Director Zang was not friendly, so we decided to wait for the head of cardiac surgery to come out of the operation room. The whole floor was crowded, as four different departments were all in the same floor. The place was crowded with people both in the wards and corridor. The corridor was taken up by the temporarily added beds. Ms. Guan and I squatted on the stairs outside the operating room, and waited for the department director. Midway we posed as the patient's family to the ICU door to so that we could talk to the director. We were told that the director would be come out of the operation room by 2:30 pm. Taking our bags, we decided to go to the other hospital: Affiliated Hospital of Qinghai University.

 

When we arrived at the hospital, the vice director of cardiac surgery met us. He was very warm and cordial. The staff of cardiovascular surgery and cardiac surgery work in the same floor. There were 12 doctors and 19 nurses total in the cardiac surgery department. There were 2 operation rooms and only 2 sickbeds in ICU. The surgery amounted to 200 cases in which 50% were congenital heart disease. They would move to the new building in the end of the month. Everything would improve there. The old building was messy, so I thought I would take a couple pictures. So far, no non-profit charity has cooperated with them and they hoped to arrange an agreement with us. We left Little Red Scarf brochures and contact information before leaving.

 

To our disappointment, the director was still in the operation room by the time we got back to the Cardiovascular Disease Special Hospital of Qinghai Province. Director Zang was waiting for us and she told us that she read some information about Little Red Scarf from those brochures and wanted to know more details about Little Red Scarf. We informed her about the history of Little Red Scarf as well as the groups and scope of financial assistance. She listened carefully and told us that a short-term non-profit charity was already cooperating with the hospital.

 

 

They carried out various congenital heart diseases, but in the highlands, there were many children of ethnic minority. Therefore, these children had varying degrees of pulmonary hypertension when they had congenital heart disease. Some of them directly lost surgery opportunities. Their surgical volume was 300 cases in which 1/3 were congenital heart disease. For some reasons it is hard to say how many exclusive beds there were and operating rooms and ICU were mixed. They would move into a new office building around July or August. There, the office environment would greatly improve. After waiting a while longer, the director of cardiac surgery was still in the operating room, so I decided to leave Little Red Scarf brochures and contact information for him to read. We went directly to the bus station. Thus, we bid farewell to Xining City. But, I will be back one day. The sky was blue and the city was clean in Qinghai. I wished the beautiful city would keep its charm.

 

Original Article written by Jie Yun Yun Yu Jie, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/27/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Little Red Scarf Care serves to provide financial means and encouragement to children suffering from congenital heart disease. In addition, they provide the family with post-operative care and help their child sustain a healthy lifestyle. In this blog post, we are updated on the patients post-operation health. 

 

In January, there were 23 children who were healed and discharged from the hospital. We gave each of them a follow-up call, and they all answered except for the four of them who had their phones off. This is the information that we received about them.

 

Patient #303 Bingyan | Discharged: March 1, 2012 | Follow-Up: March 27, 2012

Bingyan has become totally different since she had her operation. Her constitution has become much better than before and she eats lots of food. Her family is very happy and really appreciates it.

 

Patient #305 Zewei | Discharged: January 17, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 16, 2012

He got very well after the operation. He has grown taller and fatter than before. To our amazement, he can walk.

 

Patient #308 Chengpeng | Discharged: January 20, 2012 | Follow-Up: May, 2012

Chengpeng eats much more food than before and his constitution is much better. Now, he is in the 1st grade in Elementary School. 

 

Patient #309 Xiaona | Discharged: January 16, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 27, 2012

Xiaona became much better after the operation. She rested for a short time and went to school soon after the operation. However, her shoulders only hurt if she has a cold. She continues to study very hard and is the top of the class.

 

Patient #310 Xiaomei | Discharged: January 19, 2012 | Follow-Up: April, 2012

Her father said she got well after the operation and studied very hard. Now she is a student of the 5th grade. She is a very obedient girl.

 

Patient #311 Huanxia | Discharged: January 18, 2012 | Follow-Up: None

Huanxia’s home is in the mountain so the cellular reception is bad. We just heard his father tell us that Huanxia is well and they would bring her for a hospital review during vacation.

 

Patient #312 Shuangxi | Discharged: January 18, 2012 | Follow-Up: April, 2012

Shuangxi is staying at home now. He usually writes and watches TV at home. He has grown taller and he will be in the 3rd grade next semester.

 

Patient #313 Xiaoyan | Discharged: January 19, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 16, 2012

Xiaoyan studying his third year of high school and is preparing for the examination to enter the university. Her family hoped that she would be able to rest for a longer time, but she was worried about her study so she went straight to school right after the operation. We hope she will have good results. 

 

Patient #314 Zhuanyan | Discharged: January 23, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 23, 2012

Zhuanyan’s wounds recovered well after the operation and she is preparing for the examination to high school. She is well.

 

Patient LY-144 Xiao Gong | Discharged: January 5, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 17, 2012

Xiao Gong’s constitution is much better and she has a lot of food. Now she can walk with support.

 

Patient LY-145 Yongsheng | Discharged: January 5, 2012 | Follow-Up: April, 2012

Yongsheng got well after the operation and is staying at home now. His father has been able to work outside.

 

Patient LY-148 Ge San Cai Rang | Discharged: January 9, 2012 | Follow-Up: April, 2012

Now he is staying at home with his grandma. His wounds healed well and he is healthier than before. He usually stays at home and watches TV. We suggest that he play with his peers and communicate with them.

 

Patient LY-149 Daxuan | Discharged: January 1, 2012 | Follow-Up: March, 2012

Daxuan’s mother told us that Daxuan was a good boy and that he was staying at home. He usually helps his mom cook, wash dishes, and feed chickens. Daxuan told us he was excited that he could run. We encouraged him to study hard and overcome all the difficulties just like defeating evil diseases.

 

Patient LY-151 Xiaoqi | Discharged: January 11, 2012 | Follow-Up: None

Xiaoqi’s family is glad that Xiaoqi has grown fatter and taller. Xiaoqi is preparing for her final examination and will be available for hospital review during the summer holiday.

 

Patient LY-152 Xiaowei | Discharged: January 8, 2012 | Follow-Up: April, 2012

Xiaowei’s father told us that Xiaowei became fatter and is well. But her breastbone protrudes a little bit. We suggested that she bask every day and do chest expanding exercises.

 

Patient LY-153 Snowflake | Discharged: January 16, 2012 | Follow-Up: April 5, 2012

She is well and has been getting fatter and taller. She is in now in the 7th grade. 

 

Patient LY-154 Dongsheng | Discharged: January 23, 2012 | Follow-Up: May 9, 2012

He recovered well and has been fatter and taller. He even eats more food than before.

 

Patient LY-155 Xiufen | Discharged: January 23, 2012 | Follow-Up: March, 2012

Xiufen was reviewed 2 months after the operation and she grew fatter. She is now in the 9th grade so she is living at school and preparing for her final examination. Her father apologized for not contacting us before the review.

 

To our delight, these children immediately started their new lives after operation. Xiaoyan is preparing for her college entrance examination while Zhuanyan is preparing for her high school entrance examination. Both of them study efficiently; we are expecting their good news as well as the birth of Little Red Scarf's first college student. 

 

Original Article written by Ying Guan, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US interns Isabel Auyeung and  Kevin Mo.

Posted: 6/25/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Oh, how I missed this office! I finally got to start again after almost a month of summer. So I’m actually really sad that half of our interns are gone and I really miss them, but also I’m quite excited about working with the new ones! We began work with the classic editing work, and I re-edited Isabel’s edits (I still had edit hers for grammar and spelling mistakes and she’s not even a FOB). After taking a quick water break, we researched a couple websites where we hope–sometime in the future–to publicize and raise enough money to be sponsored by these well-known organizations. We also navigated back to the good ol’ East Villagers website where we commented on new posts from new people. It’s awesome how there are so many different people sharing their service experiences with us!

Posted: 5/26/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Slowly but surely we're getting through that huge virtual stack of papers. We're almost towards the end of evaluating all the essays! The mini break from the essays what quite exciting as the end of the year is coming up. I can't believe the school year's over it was as if we were just getting to know our NGO's and East Villagers! Sigh...time moves too fast. 

Posted: 5/19/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Fang Zhou(Ark) Public Mutual Assistance Center 

The Organization Trends of April in 2012

1. Successfully purchasing the organization website domain and space.

2. Fulfillment of organization orientation.

3. Communication with youth association, society power and love heart association and fixed the position of cooperation in the future.

4. Reached a preliminary cooperation intention on the Ark charities brand image design with Square Skull and released the first logo of Ark charities.

5. Participation in visit Ren Yong Primary School and assistance in implement of eggs plan

6. Joined Transparent Fish non-profit web community and became a friend of Transparent Fish

 

Original Article written by Fang Xiao Gang, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 5/19/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In this article, Ms. Zhou tells us about her future travel plans to counsel people in many provinces. Her schedule is packed for the rest of the year. 

 

I have fought against mosquitoes for the third time and could hardly sleep last night. I woke up this morning feeling extremely uncomfortable. I picked up the phone from Yang Yi and then chatted with Wang Jun through QQ. I felt pleased and full of energy when we ended our conversation at around 12:30 pm.

It was funds and the trust of Mr. and Mrs. Zhao and patient of staff that have encouraged me. Both Wang Jun and I said, “It is great to do something meaningful.”

We planned the time to Sichuan 2 months ago. But something unexpected happened before I left. My sister and sister-in-law bot had an operation at the same day. My sister lived alone outside but no one looked after her.

The entire burden was on my husband’s shoulder once I left. But there were 200 women waiting for me.

Anyway, I came to Sichuan according my schedule, but seeing the need and sincerity on their faces, all the complaining had disappeared. They desired for knowledge and changes. I planned activities on Children’s Day. If the activities turn out to be successful, then they could be promoted to any non-profit organizations all over the country.

With the support of Mr. Zhao, I did my work without any worries. Non-profit organizations, communities, and corporations praised my experience and plans. My work schedule has been arranged until the end of the year.

Finishing the activities, I was going to practice my plans in Henan Province. I think these activities could be helpful in many ways—such as children education, couple relationship, interpersonal relationship, mental health, and childbearing.

What I wish to say the most to Mr and Mrs. Zhao was, "Thanks for your trust."

In fact, we just met for the first time and had built a trusting relationship that makes everything so much more possible. To the end of the year, I will travel to the north-west district and several inland cities. I hope our work will satisfy Mr. Zhao and our team.

In addition that, thank my husband for his great support.

 

 

Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 5/19/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. She tells us about her conversation with a visitor from Hong Kong that is suffering from a recent, tragic event.

 

Below is a conversation I had with a Hong Kong visitor.

Visitor: You are the most passionate psychotherapist I have seen, thanks all the friends who introduced you to me.

Me: Thanks for your trust. What would you like to talk about?

Visitor: I think I’m going to collapse.

M: Why?

Visitor: I must divorce my wife, otherwise I won’t wish to live any more.  

M: Could you tell me what happened

Visitor: My 14-year-old girl committed suicide several days ago, and I think it was the pressure my wife put on her that led to her death. 

M: I’m so sorry to hear that.

Visitor: *sobbing*

M: Is your wife your daughter’s biological mother?

Visitor: Yes.

M: Does she have any grudges against your daughter?

Visitor: No, but she was always pushing her?

M: Do you think that your wife is the only one to push your child? What about other people in Hong Kong?

Visitor: No.

M: Why was it that only your daughter chose to end her life? Is it all due to your wife’s failure in education and communication with your daughter?

Visitor: I never thought about it.

M: Is it only the mother's responsibility to educate the children?

Visitor: My wife has a bad temper and doesn't care much about my daughter. She doesn’t know how to teach children.

M: Well, if you know how to teach children and you have a good temper, then why did your daughter choose to leave you?

Visitor: Because I’m always so busy with my work.

M: Does your wife feel happy after your daughter passed away?

Visitor: … She has been in hospital for a long time.

M: In that case, why are you going to divorce your wife to hurt her more?

Visitor: ……

Visitor: Thank you, Ms. Zhou. I will go to see my wife.

 

 

Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 5/17/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

When we came to the office this morning, we had a nice surprise from Steve's girlfriend. We got a TON of snacks YAY. They definitely helped us power through the day as I read just as many essays as I did eat Oreos. I couldn't believe how many entries we had this year, we almost had 300! Good job to those who submitted! So far, they were all very interesting to read about your service experiences. But we probably won't finish until summer since there's just so much. It was very inspiring to see so many more people that were passionate about service!
 

Posted: 5/10/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Who doesn't love pranks? Morning was off to a lively start as all five of us got to the office before Steve! However, the workload wasn't any less; we had a TON of contest submissions to read and grade. I don't think I've read so many essays in one sitting before... They were definitely worth the read though. Some of the essays were really touching, others opened my eyes to things I haven't seen before, and a couple were just all-out people for service. Great job to those who submitted! It's coming to a close so we'll see who wins the competition. I also exported the Translation Videos and sent them to Steve. Definitely worth watching once we upload them!

 

Posted: 5/5/2012 - 3 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 People with leprosy are sent to isolated places without families or friends to support them emotionally of physically. They are abandoned and forgotten by society. The Shalom Leprosy Compassion Ministry has a heart for these people and organizes groups of volunteers to travel to leprosy villages and provide medical, living, and psychological assistance. The following article is a group of volunteers providing medicine for anabrosis patients. 

 

It was a lucky April for the leprosy patients, especially for those who had anabrosis—with the help of an American college student and an old nurse Nancy, 5 boxes of medicine were taken to KunMing from the USA.

 

Anabrosis is a disease that not only causes pain, infection, and fever, but is extremely detrimental to their life and health. These leprosy patients that also had anabrosis desperately hoped for a kind of medicine that would cure their aching disease. 

 

With the help of volunteers, the Shalom team was able to send medicine to Zhushan and Yangjuangou in Yiliang on April 15th. They even changed the medicine for 9 patients. After instructing the patients on how to properly use the medicine, the team left the patients a week's worth of medicine. On April 21st, there was fantastic news from patients. Their anabrosis had become much better and their nagging pain gradually disappeared. Granulation tissue began to grow in the wounds.             

  

The next day, Nancy and other volunteers went to Aziying of Kunming. There, they applied MEDIHONEY and provided new socks for patients. On April 23rd, Timmy, a teacher from Texas of the USA, and the Shalom team fetched water from the mountain six times in order to prepare clean drinking water for the patients. Two days later, Nancy, Liang Ping, and other volunteers visited patients again. This time, they focused on the patients’ recovery and gave them more guidance on how to use the medicine. Shalom and the recovered patients gave many thanks to Nancy, Dimay, and the other volunteers, and especially thanked the USA company that provided them the free medicine. At the same time, we also appreciated Kunming volunteers’ participation and coorperation.

 

Miss Ping Liang helping Xu Jinyuan with his ulcers. She is applying MEDIHONEY.

 

Nancy, one of the American volunteers, is helping the patient by applying medicine.

 

Volunteers journey to get clean, sanitary water for the villagers.

 

Original Article written by Ping Liang, translated ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo. 

Posted: 5/5/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 People with leprosy are sent to isolated places without families or friends to support them emotionally of physically. They are abandoned and forgotten by society. The Shalom Leprosy Compassion Ministry has a heart for these people and organizes groups of volunteers to travel to leprosy villages and provide medical, living, and psychological assistance. The following is an article about the volunteer's experience in ZhuShan.

 

On April 23, an American teacher, Timmy, students, and Shalom Liang Ping visited four recovery patients in Zhushan. They helped by cutting firewood and cleaning houses. Since the recovery patients had to use extremely turbid water, the volunteers helped find clean drinking water for patients. This murky water often led to serious health problems that would hurt the patients even more. 

The previous three year drought in the Yunnan Province made the majority of the water source dried up. Thus, water supply was very minimal, and the water in the poor areas became turbid. Due to their handicap, it was very difficult for them to fetch clean water from far away. Led by Lao Li, these volunteers would gather buckets to fetch water. Though the journey to the water source was tough, they still went back and forth six times and brought back 50 buckets of water that the patients would be able to use for ten days. 

We were not only able to provide them with medicine, but we also bought to them clean drinking water which the poor townspeople have been thirsting for for so long. We also reported this water problem to the local government and hoped that they would actually do something about it. (Recently, we received the news that the Yiliang Health Bureau had allocated funds and sent professionals to the area to solve the problem. This problem will be solved within the following week!)

 

Original Article written by Ping Liang, translated ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo. 

Posted: 5/4/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

So I came to the office super tired since I was at my church's lock-in the night before and we hardly got any sleep, but we ended up getting locked out LOL. It took us a while before we got in but luckily a nice woman came out and let us in! I even had to go down to the parking garage to see if there was an entrance, but it was so scary I felt like I was in a horror movie. ANYWAY, I started off work by editing another update from Ms. Zhou (which you guys should all read!) and then read some more Essay and Art Contest sumbissions. We're getting a lot which I'm so glad to see, and people are even posting them on the East Villagers website! We also starred the couple ones that we liked the most so we're drawing closer and closer to the final submission days. Oh, I also edited another Translation Video to complete the three videos. So we should be uploading those soon (I think Steve said next Saturday). It's really inspiring to see that these lives were changed from everyone's efforts in donating, supporting, and praying for them. Can't wait to see who wins the contest!

Posted: 4/28/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In this article, we read about her experience and counseling appointment with one of her patients who thought he needed help. 


 
An old couple was led by their daughter in-law to come to the Counseling Room. The old man wore an outdated suit and a grey-blue hat. His wife was in a plaid jacket, newly brought by her daughter in-law, and came in with a big smile. The obedient daughter in-law supported her father in-law with her hands. It seemed that they had a very harmonious relationship. 
 
The old man couldn’t wait to talk with me.
 
”Mrs Zhou, I believe that you can cure me. I have seen several doctors in several hospitals and spent a large sum of money, but none of them have been able to cure me. Even one of doctors said I was not sick. If I am not ill, why do I feel so uncomfortable?”
 
His daughter in-law told me that his father in-law cared about his health way too much. Recently, the old man had been worried and sleepless for more than a month. His children took him to see doctor, but the doctors have all said that there was nothing wrong with him except a mild Vegetative nerve functional disturbance.
 
I asked the old man when he usually goes to to bed in the evening and gets up in the morning, and what he thought about before sleep every day. He told me that he went to bed before 8 PM and would get up at 4 AM. Before sleeping, he would mostly think about who managed the farmland and who took care of his wife. He always dreams of his parents who died a couple of years ago.
 
We discussed his first two questions at ease. He said yes with nodding his head. When we talked about the third question, I smiled at him and said it was a good thing to dream of parents. When we gradually became older and older, it is great to see our parents in our dreams. I did not think it was bad to see my parents in my dreams since I too, often dreamed of them.
 
"In that case, I do not have a serious illness."
 
"Well, what do you think?"
 
"I know that there are sophisticated equipments in hospital but I can’t control myself in to thinking about it too much."
 
"You are too happy. Your family loves you and many people in your village envy you because of this."
 
"Yes, all the villagers would agree with you."
 
He and I talked about life, health, and family. The atmosphere in the counseling room was relaxed and peaceful.
 
He asked me, ”Do you think I won't need to do any more work on the farmland?"
 
I told him, ”Just plant how much you want to plant, and treat it like a hobby.”
 
"Oh yeah! It will just be my exercise then," he said loudly.
 
Finally, I gave him some advice. First, try to take a walk outside and wash your feet afterwards. Go to bed after 9 PM. Second, while you guys are in good health, travel and go on a vacation with your wife a couple times every year. 
 
He promised that he was sure to do what I told him. I told him not to pay me since he was so clever and obedient. But if he goes back home and doesn't listen to her children, then next time you will be paying me at least 500 RMB! He got up and shook my hand, saying, "That's fair! That's fair!"
 
As he walked down the stairs, he said to himself, "Those intellectual counselors, man, they are different!"
 
During the over one hour counseling, I didn't mention any professional terms nor did I take up a prideful attitude. Thus, we were able to work together and solve the old man's problem. Sometimes it is important for a counselor to have a kind heart rather than professional knowledge.
 
 
Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 4/28/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 I was reading all the other iterns' weekly reflections and it's really made me thing how much of a family we've become. This is actually my sixth month here and it totally did not feel like half a year has gone by. And that's a good thing! It's really become a part of my Junior life and I can't imagine what it would be like without it, besides sleeping in on Saturday's. But I would definitely not trade that for the work that we do and the lives that we can help and impact. Last week, I had to leave work early but from what I just read, everyone's talking about the good byes :[ I'm just so grateful for this opportunity to serve as an intern to help others. Every week I look forward to the exciting things Steve brings on the table. See ya in about six hours!

Posted: 4/21/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

On March 12 at 8pm, in building B104, class 09465 of the Communist Youth League and Light of Love Philanthropy team successfully launched the “Delivery of Love” project. This project aims to deliver donations to underprivileged students in the mountain regions of Guizhou.

Li from class 09465 hosted the ceremony, introducing the purpose and meaning of this event. Li  talked about the clothes, shoes, bags, guitar, toys, and supplies his class had collected. Liu from Light of Love Philanthropy introduced everyone to the means through which the donations will be delivered to the children and showed pictures of last year’s project. He gave thanks to his colleagues of class 09465 for the kids. After the ceremony, Light of Love members stored the donations, which they will distribute to the kids this summer.

This event demonstrates a sense of social responsibility of college students. It also presents a new way to encourage donations in the future.

Light of Love members photo. 

 

Original article written by Yin Wei, translated ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Sarah Chang.

Posted: 4/21/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In this article, she writes about her mountain peregrination with a girl she is counseling, and an encounter with a poor shepherd. 

 

When doing public service, one must serve with a loving heart.

I told this story before: there was this high school girl who had a lot of pressure from studying, as well as a high self-esteem and a bad relationship with her mother which led to her obsessive-compulsive disorder. One of her friends introduced her to a downtown psychiatrist treatment center, and within four months, spent about 30,000 RMB (~4,800 USD). By chance, the director of the women in the town recommended my counseling and she was able to find me. The first time when we met, she told me that she could not go to her school classes, and even at home she felt extremely unhappy, irritated, and anxious because of this situation.

So far we have only met 4 times, and after the second time we met, her parents called and happily said: "This time we are on the right path! Our whole family has hope now!"

Yesterday was the weekend and the girls asked if she could see me. I told her mother to let her take the bus to come to the hillside to find me. Now is that season where the grass green, flowers are blooming, and I believe that nature would be a much better place than my counseling office. 

Since we will be going up the mountain, I was a little concerned about the safety issue. So I sent my husband to scout ahead of us and also take pictures for us as well. As we walked down the road, there were rows of pines, fully bloomed apricots, and I talk to her about nature, life, and her future. We found a smooth place to sit down and I asked her take out the homework I gave to her titled “My Dream." I had her read it out loud in front of the mountain and the nature, along with a passionate voice, appropriate language. The way everything fit together and her description of her dream really touched me. It was as if I could see her dream become reality already! How is it that this a girl needs to take medicine? She's fine the way she is!

We took a total of about 40 pictures, and on the way back down from the mountain, we came across an old shepherd. What surprised us was that while the sheep were on their own just peacefully eating the grass on the hillside, the elder was just sitting down under the shade and reading a book. Of course I had to ask the shepherd some questions and I intended that the girl would listen!

The shepherd is not that old, he's 61 years of age and has only taken a few days of junior high school. At home there were a lot of men, he calls himself "foolish" and their family was poor. No one would really like to talk to him—not even his family. 

He has been married for four years and has a three year old child. His wife is forty seven years old and was bought through a process of several people form Guang Xi. She was disabled and had no ID card—basically she had nothing. Their family had to rely on the several sheep they owned in order to survive, and could only make about 10,000 RMB every year (~1,600 USD). Despite all of these hardships he has to go through, he loves to read. He enjoys knowing about the government’s things, and also is afraid he would forget all his Chinese is he didn't read. He says, "My books are all bought on the street and at home, there is a pile of them." 

I told him that the next time I came up to the mountains I would give him books or newspapers.

After we walked down from the mountain, I asked the girl a few questions about life, the book, her future. The girl didn't say very much, but as we departed from each other, I asked the girl to write a piece about her feelings and thoughts about today, and she nodded her head saying, "Of course, I can write it right way!"

As for the psychotherapist, what role did she play in the end? Were there high counseling fees? Mysteries? Will there be a lot of technology involved?

How many people do not understand psychological treatment, and just how many people are actually treated or cured? As for the elderly shepherd, he doesn't even know his own language, behavior, or attitude toward life, and I hope he can find us for counseling as well.

Studying the issue. 

We have established a great relationship.

We encountered an elderly shepherd reading books on the way down from the mountain.

His family's goat. 

 

Original Article written by Ms. Zhou, translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 4/19/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

We started off work with translating work, and I was able to find out that Ms. Zhou got a laptop! She even had a mini post about how convenient having a laptop has made her work. Reminded me that I take so many things for granted, because around where I live everyone seems to have a laptop so it's not that big of a deal. Next, Steven had me and Sophia work on the Beneficiary Video where we added subtitles to the testimony videos that the saved patients and their families gave. Sophia's was really touching and it even made Isabel cry LOL, but it was actually pretty moving I have to admit. We also had a 45 minute long Skype conference with Nancy about how the NGO's have been doing lately, and she also helped us with future work with our NGO's. 

I've been thinking about what I'm doing over the summer, and most likely I should be able to continue my internship! yayyy

Posted: 4/14/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. She talks about her recent health issues and the work she still has to do. 

 

Recently, because of my poor health, I was not able to go to the countryside. And even while I have to do infusion therapy, I also have to prepare my next segment of work. 

I sit in bed with a computer on my lap, doing a series of courseware and organizing the files of many visitors. These files include mental health knowledge training courseware, children's education, interpersonal communication skills, prenatal care, and early childhood. 

After I finish, if there is any public service team in need of this, I am completely open for service and can help them!

 

Original Article translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 4/13/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Unfortunately I had to miss work again last Saturday. I was feeling very ill and the doctor's thought I had mono but after the blood tests I turned out negative. That's definitely a good thing. However, I did miss coming to work, but I still received a gazillion emails from Steve for the contest entries! Looks like more and more people are submitting their essays. I guess tomorrow at work we'll be editing them again.

Oh, I remember last time I came to work I read like eight essays and there was one that I really liked. Like, I really liked what the author did and how he wrote about it, but none of them were super like "BAAAAAAMMMMMM THIS IS NICE". It's okay, I don't think I could've written anything like it, and I'm sure we'll come across a really nice one. I just realized that the year is almost over D: we only have less than two months! Dang this year went by fast.

Posted: 3/31/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

I started today with editing a long article for Ms. Zhou. It was a really intense blog post because she wrote about how they were in life-threatening situations. Definitely made me grateful that I don't have to live in snowy conditions to deal with these situations. Afterwards, I got to evaluate some of the submissions for the Art and Essay Contest! It was amazing reading all these different volunteer experiences from the volunteers. We got submissions from all over the country, something that really surprised me. 

Steve also talked about continuing the internship over the summer. It really made me think about the rest of this year because the summer and first half of senior year is going to be really busy. I really enjoy this internship and felt that my Saturday mornings are actually really well spent. I'll think about more about what I'm doing this summer and hopefully I'll be able to continue! Or if I won't be able to, I will definitely encourage some of my friends to apply! :] 

Posted: 3/31/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. She writes about a life-threatening experience when coming back home. 

I came home a little worried on the 17th of this month, because the weather report said that Beijing had bad weather so the airport was forced to delay hundreds of flights.

Arriving in NanChong airport, and I heard that the plane would arrived on time, so I called home to pick me up at the airport. Turns out they already left in the pouring rain.

Nevertheless, the plane was still delayed, as there was air traffic control.

I looked forward to take off; I looked forward to land.

When I walked out of the airplane, snowflakes fell from the sky as it was below zero degrees. It was about midnight.

Jing and XiaoLe were already waiting for me. I gave XiaoLe a hug, and also wanted to give Jing one, but I saw his fatigue andy angular statue and my heart felt great remorse. 

Outside, snow falled heavily, and half the street was filled with snow. There were only a few vehicles; the three of us forgot to consider that not many vehicles went to the ring directly.

I have never in my life encountered such traffic; I could hardly see in front of me, heavy snow kept falling, and it was as if countless jumping elves kept flashing in front of my eyes, making me dizzy. The car could only move about forty steps at a time.

I couldn't rest my body against the back of the carseat because I had be wide alert to help Jing see the direction. I had to adjust my body and mind every so often, as the illusion of car after car didn't even make it seem like we were on the freeway. By chance, a larger car would pass by, revealing a spectacular scenery: the golden light danced in the boundless sky, and the little snowflakes became so keen and ferocious. At the same time, the big car rolled up a pile of snow and hit our little vehicle, making a muffled thunder sound, and we felt that it was the end of the world.

Several times, the window wipers stopped working, and Jing had to get out of the car to manually remove the pieces of ice. As soon as you opened the door, snow and wind would rush into the car and it became so cold that it would make a person tremble. At this time we also noticed that the snow has fallen six inches on the side of the road. 

When the windshield wipers became to frozen to not function, driving became a lot more difficult, and we became a lot more nervous. Jing had to stress his eyes to stay concentrated and all of a sudden we came to a screeching halt. He said that suddenly a mountain appeared in front of him, but luckily there were little cars or else we would have rear-ended the car. I constantly had hallucinations, having no clue where I was.

When we finally got to YuTian, the gas tank had almost emptied, and as we pulled up into the rest area to refuel, Jing shouted, "Break failure!" But in reality, the ground was just frozen.

I felt that in order for us to not be afraid, King had to remain calm. And after this entire event was over, from the way he was telling people, it was enough to prove my conclusion that he was panicked and nervous, yet he didn't show it.

XiaoLe, who was sitting in the back, noted that this was like a movie, so exciting! She said that it seemed like we were traveling through a time tunnel, as if we traveled back to the Tang dynasty. She fell asleep after a while. However we weren't any less nervous; XiaoLe trusted us to be responsible for her. 

XiaoLe woke up when we passed the last toll station, and as we looked back we saw how we were protected in all these times of dangers, so we were very thankful. Jing rolled down the window to ask the cashier lady if she was afraid of the cold. I said it was good that we came by, or else the lady would be standing in the cold for nothing. 

When we almost arrived home, there was another break failure, and the car floated to the roadside. Fortunately, there were no other cars on the road.

We finally arrived home on the morning of the second day. Everyone washed up, drank some yogurt, and we didn't even unpack our bags before we went to sleep on the bed.

He has been home waiting for the past twenty days, and in our lives we have never been separated for more than fourteen days! I looked at how exhausted everyone was, especially Jing, and I felt sorry to the family for my constant stay and leave.

I think in my dream, I heard Jing shout, "Our car's license plate is gone, and that after the car was washed, the entire front was sealed by a large chunk of ice, as if the car had been pulled out of the mud. 

As we listened to the traffic reports, we were so thankful and blessed to have survived—there had been more than sixty accidents that night. 

Hey, we were snow survivors!

 

Original article translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo.

Posted: 3/29/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

 Our morning began with more editing work, which we all managed to finish and post right away! The translations were hard to understand so I had to use some of my rusty Chinese skills to better write the story. However, it was worth it in the end–I got to share out a voice and help tell a story that could potentially change someone's life! Sophia finished the intern video and it looks awesome, although we all tend to run away whenever we see ourselves on the big screen. I know it will be great encouragement for future interns though. :]

Posted: 3/29/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Project Story

1 year. 24,000 children and women rescued. X number still abducted and enslaved. Thank God, China was able to rescue these victims that were sold for adoption or forced into prostitution. Human trafficking has become an major problem in the world today, and we have the most slaves in all of history. The thing is, it all happens under our eyes, and we never really find out until we read articles about it. We read about successful rescue missions, saved kids returned to their families, and women back to their husbands. But what about the ones that we don't hear about? The ones who can't hear their mother's cry. The ones that are forced to live in a house of a perpetrator.

According to CNN reports, a boy could sell for as much as 50,000 yuan ($7,905) and a girl could sell for 30,000 yuan ($4,743). Due to China's strict "one-child" policy, couples unable to conceive a son can simply just buy one. But these boys aren't boys that are put up for adoption; they're boys that already have a loving family at home. And for girls, they would be sold as laborers or brides for unwedded sons. 
On the bright side, the public security ministry said that they cracked about 3,200 trafficking gangs last year, one of which includes a ring that would send Chinese women to Angola to become prostitutes. 
Every life is so precious. You already know that. It doesn't matter where you're from, what you can do, or what you think of yourself. You're human. You have a life, and that's far greater than what anyone could ask for. Life is priceless, you shouldn't be able to simply just "buy" other people. But sadly, so many children and women, not only in China, are being abducted and sold, stripped of their own lives to be molded into something they aren't. We can't let this happen. 

Posted: 3/24/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in rural areas. In this article documenting her festival activity, Ms. Zhou writes about the experience the people had at her event. 

I had planned activities for this festival over a month ago. 

 

I single-handedly looked for five contestants, and theme was "What kind of woman is the most beautiful?" It was what my lecture would be about. 

 

 

The first contestant was a village kindergarten teacher, and she was very talented. She gave her speech "The Most Beautiful, Happy Woman". 

 

The second contestant was a woman's director of a village, and among the five contestants, she was the only one that I didn't change a word in her contest paper because I was afraid I might damage the kind of simple beauty. She said, "Women who are very sentimental are the most beautiful women; a fourth generation women is the most beautiful woman; women working in the fields are the most beautiful women, and having the courage to stand on the stage, like me, are also the most beautiful women!"

 

The third contestant was a girl working in a factor. Her speech was entitled "Labors of Women are the Most Beautiful". 

 

The fourth contestant was a determined, young mother who wished to own a home business. She titled her speech "I Want to be a Beautiful Angle". 

 

The fifth contestant was a retired cadre, and I found him on the street. Because he was a man, a lot of people questioned his appearance on stage, however, I had my own plan and let him speak on stage. Turns out, he had a lot of fun with this activity, and one of his topics was "The Sunset Woman is the Most Beautiful Woman". He also took two questions and answered them exquisitely. One questions was "Between mental health and physical health, which one do you think is more important to have?" He answered, "Both are important! A week mental health will lead to physical ailments, and families have to suffer to pay the medical bills. The other question was "Who was the most beautiful woman you have ever seen? It can be woman in your life, TV, books, but you need to tell us why." He said, "Of all the women I have seen in my 60 years of existence, Ms. Zhou is the most beautiful woman of them all! Even though she is retired, she still comes to provide with counseling. She is knowledgable, caring, enthusiastic, beautiful, and this is why I believe she is the most beautiful woman!" His answer brewed lots of laughter and applause from the audience. 

 

 

After the event was over, I gave myself and evaluation; the overall feeling is that as long as the participants will get love, happiness, inspiration, it makes it all worth it in the end. Some of the guests attending said, "This activity has had a tremendous impact on the local women, and its effects cannot be estimated!" The organizers of the event said, "As long as it's Ms. Zhou's class, no matter how many people attend, they will all end up following her footsteps." 

 

 

 

Original article translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo. 

Posted: 3/24/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in the rural areas. In this article that she wrote, Ms. Zhou talks about her personal encounter with a stranger at the ChengDu railroad station. 

 

On March 2nd, I arrived in Nanjing; on the 3rd, I had a class to teach; on the 4th, I left early in the morning to fly to ChengDu. Coming out of the ShuangLiu airport, it was raining really hard, yet I still had to run to the train station to buy a ticket to NanChong. Somehow, I managed to purchase a ticket, however there were no seats remaining for her on the train. I was slightly frustrated, and didn't wish to eat anything at noon. And since I had luggage on me, it was inconvenient to go outside, so I just found an empty chair indoors and started reading. 

 

Just as I sat down, a mother and daughter came by; the daughter looked about 50 years old, and the mother was about 80, and the two had a lot of luggage. She sat down next to me and made the initiative to talk. I knew she was with her mother and took her to visit their working daughter. Right as she found out who I was, she desperately grasped my hand and spoke to me in tears saying, "Ms. Zhou, please save my son!" 

 

Her son was 14 years old, and had Internet addiction. She and her daughter tried to tie him up and discipline him, but it didn't work. Now, he doesn't even go to school; he locked himself up in his room and jumped the window to run away. He didn't come home for a couple days, and the mother tried asking his teacher for help, but the teacher said she didn't care. She begged her daughter to not beat her little brother, yet she too didn't listen to her mother's cry, and now the mother is in despair! She said her son used to be a very good child, he studied pretty hard, was very understanding, and would even pick up an empty bottle on the street to sell for money to help reduce the burden at home. A couple years ago, her husband suddenly passed away, and she was forced to work in the city, and her son and his 90 year old grandma remained at home. Her son said that many times people didn't care for him at all, and the mother didn't realize it until the problem really got worse. 

 

What am I supposed to say? There's a lot of children like these—parents without culture and having to work outside—and these little children don't have anyone to talk to and feel isolated from the older generation. They feel lonely, empty, destitute, and look to the outside world for happiness, only to find themselves becoming addicted to the Internet. 

 

I tore two pieces of paper from my notebook–on one I wrote what she should do when she gets back; on the other I wrote to her daughter to tell her not to ever beat her brother and to cooperate with her mother to correctly treat her brother. I also left with them my cell phone number and QQ number as well. She took out her own ID card, and I recorded her name and home address, and promised that if I had the chance, I would visit them. 

 

When it was time to check the train tickets, she insisted that I go to the 6 compartment with her so I could sit with them. I originally was in carriage 4, so I had to refuse. She took my bags and got on the train and had me sit in her seat. She stood besides me and began introducing me to everyone that was around us, as if everyone knew who I was. I felt really embarrassed and the mother kept talking about her son and her home. 

 

The conductor was very kind, and found us a seat in carriage 5. That place was very beautiful—it faced the car window, flowers were blossoming just as beautifully as a painting—and I immediately felt peace and forgot about my fatigue. 

 

Unexpectedly, she came over in a couple minutes and sat next to me to continue talking about the same topic. 

 

We almost arrived to NanChong and because of her company, I was not lonely. She carried my luggages and sent me off, telling me over and over, "Come to my house! I'll cook you the best meals ever!"

 

Just like this, I met a visitor and began a relationship.

 

 

 

Original article translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo. 

Posted: 3/17/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Today, we edited more articles, even though mine was not related to my NGO. However, I was still deeply intruiged by what I read—the recent, ongoing human trafficking in China. And it only happened 6 days ago. 6 days. 24,000 children who were kidnapped were rescued in the past year. I just wrote a Facebook post about this article to go along with the East Villagers article I posted earlier. We also emailed more teachers from schools nearby. Sigh, it took a while and a very monotonous process, but it's for the better :]. Towards the end, we starting thinking of ways for people to become more into our Transparent Fish Facebook page. A couple ideas were either by posting pictures, fun facts, videos, etc. This is week one! Let's see how it continues.

Posted: 3/17/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Please find below a collection of statistics and news dealing with the recent trafficking issues in China. The following was gathered from multiple sources relating to this ongoing disaster.

 

China rescued more than 24,000 abducted children and women last year. Some of these victims were sold for adoption or while others were forced into prostitution as far away as Angola.

The Ministry of Public Security said that another 77 children were saved in a bust on a cross-province human trafficking network last week.

According to the Irish TImes, the ministry told the annual parliament, the National People’s Congress, that the police rescued a total of 8,660 abducted children and 15,458 women in busts of 3,195 human trafficking gangs during 2011.

Agence France-Presse also notes that the trafficking of boy children is a particularly serious problem in China — and is blamed in part on the strict "one-child" policy. Couples unable to conceive a son, or male heir, can simply just obtain one.

Global Times, a state-run newspaper, interviewed Chen Qingwei, a police officer who helped crack down an infant trafficking case in Shandong, and he said that couples who sold their babies were mainly from poverty-stricken areas.

"A boy could fetch a price as high as 50,000 yuan ($7,905)," Chen reportedly said, "with the price for girls at about 30,000 yuan ($4,743). This is far more than what parents could make by farming the land." (CNN)

Girls, in the meantime, were sold to foreign adoptive parents as "orphans," CNN reported, according to the Southern Metropolis News.

Times also wrote that several Vietnamese gangs were also smuggling children from Vietnam into China.

AFP reported that the public security ministry said that they had cracked nearly 3,200 trafficking gangs last year, including a ring that sent Chinese women to Angola to work as prostitutes.

"In November 2011, the public security ministry dispatched a police team to Angola... and detained 16 suspects and freed 19 Chinese women." according to AFP.

Girls and women also are abducted and used as laborers or as brides for unwed sons (Irish Times).

On the bright side, Times also writes that the ministry had cited its work in helping reunite children with their families using new technology, such as a DNA database and a Weibo microblog account.

The ministry also vowed sterner crackdowns against trafficking, says the Xinhua News Agency.

This updated was posted by ShiShi Ma.
The article sources are listed below:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17330203
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-16072888
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8130900.stm

 

Posted: 3/17/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 I was quite surprised when Steve asked me to look for promotional items, like squishy cows and rabbits. It was actually really entertaining to browse for East Villagers promo products for the next hour. Maybe if I ever start my company, I'll need to do this as well! But yeah, you should be excited that there will be some extremely interesting yet awesome rewards on the online store. Next, we went through a list of potential companies or organizations that would help publicize our scholarship. I got to email CollegeBoard :O even though I hate their tests. We're still looking for more entrees for the East Villagers Essay and Art contest, and I definitely think it'll will be rewarding even to ourselves just to read what other students have to say about social justice. 

Posted: 3/10/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Ms. Zhou focuses on mental and psychological counseling for woman in the rural areas. In this article, she talks about her experience giving a lecture at QianXi Teachers' Education. 

Even though I was very stressed because of all the things I had to deal with, I agreed anyway to join QianXi Teachers’ Education.

This is my first experience training teachers who are actually the teachers of other local teachers. There was a total of 50 people. Some of the prerequisites for this Education Training were "mental health knowledge and interpersonal communication skills".

The course definitely pressed me on time, because I already had a lot to prepare for the Nanjing lectures and the activities on March 8th in Nanchang city.

I spoke for a total of two hours. Two hours which I practically did not get to walk around. Two hours where 50 eyes were always glued on me. Two hours where I wasn’t even allowed a couple minutes of rest.

After the meeting concluded, some of the leaders offered some inspirational feedback, “This lecture will be a milestone for QianXi education history; it is of great significance and of great impact to our QianXi education!" One of the principals said, "This is just the knowledge that we want—the details, truths, principles, and individual stories were able to be deeply understood. It quenched our thirst!" Trade union chairman said, "If you look into the future, this education will ultimately bring you a job, reward you with a happy live, and a chance to be seen as a role model for all the teachers of this county." A male teacher said, "From now on, I will help my wife with some household chores, and never again will I have to care about those little, trivial things..."

It seems like this lecture blessed me with a lot of work. The Bureau leaders also said that they would work to further promote mental health education, and they hope to schedule appointments to have some deep discussions with me.

Although they weren’t able to help me with financial aid, but the dinner was excellent. Thirteen different leaders ate with me! I know I can’t control too much; I only know how to lecture, and I’m going to do what I should do, that’s it.

 

 

Original article translated by ShiShi Ma, edited by US intern Kevin Mo. 

 

 

 

Posted: 3/2/2012 - 1 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Wow haven't been at work for like three weeks! I really miss it. Anyway, on Saturday we started off by finding a bunch of schools to email. I mainly targeted middle schools and apparently there is a middle school in Oakland called the Barack Obama Academy. Anyway, I was surprised to find out that I was supposed to be interviewed for a documentary film. Before my interview I didn't look over the questions because I felt like improvising would've been more natural and fun! I'm really looking forward to the final product of the documentary. After my interview, I continued sending out emails and then worked on editing the TFish Quarterly Update. Lots of stuff to look forward to!

Posted: 2/25/2012 - 3 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

Ms. Zhou writes about her encounter with YingZi, a local directer of a women's organization in the SiChuan Province. Ms. Zhou focuses on psychological counseling for rural women. 

 

YingZi is the director of a women’s organization located in a village in Pengan County, Nanchong City, SiChuan Province. Ever since I’ve come to Nanchong, she has always been talking with me and getting to know me better. I really like and admire this peasant girl.

She is 38 years old, and has worked many hard years outside of her hometown. YingZi was also self-educated to earn an associate degree, and later establishing her own career.
She told me about her village, her family, her past, and her ideals: she has six brothers, each with his own dream; each one is the author of their own legendary life story of epic ups and downs. However, YingZi felt responsible for all the unfortunate things that happened at home. She talked about the subtle relationships at her husband's family, her husband’s poor childhood, and the pitiful, wandering days during his young adult years. She talked about her rural sisters and her folks. The majority of the people in the rural areas have constantly been suffering, and to make situations worse, nowadays, after they earn money from places outside of their hometown, they live drunken, gluttonous, gambling lifestyles without caring about their wives and kids. The wives and children are left with nothing and are forced to give up all hope. The village women quarrel and gossip with each other and when they unpleasant events happen they can even furiously curse at each other for three days and nights. She sees how much these people are suffering and wants to help them, but YingZi does not know what to do. This is where we come in.
The improvement of the GTP seems to have nothing to do with us. The government always claims to give more to the farmers, but I’ve never noticed any care from this society on a deeper level, as if these are things only people from the city can enjoy. “Over the years I have been thinking What can I do? Now I see you; I found the answer: Teacher Zhou, I'm going to do what you do to make my folks to live happy and purposefully. I want to teach them to read, and I want to guide them to properly educate their children. I hope men will learn the responsibility they have in the family, to be responsible to the wife and kids. I also hope that the sisters do not give up on themselves and waste their precious lives! "
The things that Yingzi said deeply moved me and made me see the hope. Isn’t coming to the rural area’s goal is to see people like her? There is a saying that the best salvation is self-help, and I believe that the Yingzi has that ability!
"I always have feelings for the land in which I grew up; I love the land, and I am distressed to see the barren land. I want to come back!"
"The years I spend of hard work outside is not to make money, not to escape, but to achieve a childhood dream. I like to help those who were widowed since a very young age, and regardless of what others think, I will help them to carry out their daily tasks. I think one day when I have enough money, I’ll build a nursing home in the village, so that the older people of our village can also enjoy their end stage of life like those who live in the city. "
She and I talked for a few hours. I helped her analyze her familial confusion, her marriage, her folks, provided her with some suggestions. I also said that the next time I come to Sichuan, I’ll certainly find time to visit her village, to help her make plans about educational activities of the villagers. When I was leaving, she said to me, tears streaming from her eyes, “Teacher Zhou, from now on, I am born again.” I like Yingzi and wish I could give her more support. She is the hope of the village.
 
Story Link: http://www.toumingyu.org/zhouyonghong/story/7735/
Story written by Ms. Zhou
Translated by ShiShi Ma
Edited by US Intern Kevin Mo

Posted: 2/4/2012 - 2 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

In the Fujian Province, Hunag Sheng Xing works at the CP Saplings Family Support Center, where he teaches autistic children. Years ago, an accident occured where Huang Sheng Xing became paralyzed from the waist down, forcing him to rely on families members to support his needs. He even considered committing suicide. Last year, his parents brought him to a center where other disabled children also resided. From this treatment, today, he can not only take care of himself, but he can also encourage other handicapped people to "stand up." Experts pointed out that creating this community of disabled people allows them to find self-worth and care for each other where they do not feel alone and hopeless. 

Posted: 1/7/2012 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Hao Yun, Grade 6 in Accenture Hope School 

When Hao Yun was in 5th Grade, she went to a Love Currency Transfer activity held at her school that emphasized the importance of service through action. Hao was the first in her class to try the activity. As the activity began, Hao looked for those who needed help, so that she might be able to show her love. Then, the opportunity came.

Once, when Hao was on a bus, an elderly lady with a cane got onto the bus, and stood beside her. Because the bus was so bumpy, the lady was not able to balance herself very well, and so Hao quickly gave up her seat. With a face gleaming with gratitude, the lady thanked her repeatedly, and Hao replied with modesty and pride saying, “You are welcome, it was only my duty to do so.”

In addition, another time, some students that were on duty were so busy training that they could not spare any time to do their own duty work. Hao wanted to show her love, so she not only did her own work, but also helped them finish their duty work too.

There have been many other occurrences like these. By the end of the activity, Hao did best with a grand total of 25 love currencies transferred, and won a Noah Learning Machine from Accenture.

 

 

Posted: 12/27/2011 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: General Blog

 Yesterday, some leaders and I came to teach in a village called GuanYuan. At 8 o’clock in the morning, we came to the meeting room which was nice and bright in the village. Upon arriving, I only saw two people there. I asked why there were so little people and someone said that the old branch secretary broadcasted the news that the lesson was about health and the villagers were sick of selling medicine and health products so they didn’t want to come.

The women’s federation chairman in the county accompanying me, was somewhat embarrassed. I was also very upset. The president decided to introduce myself and my lessons by the big trumpet immediately. Then, we went to wait in an office upstairs. After about 10 minutes, a village came to us and told us to begin teaching because there were so many people. I went downstairs doubtfully. Oh my God, over 60 people had come to the meeting room.

I kept teaching until 11 o’clock and nobody was willing to leave. The old village head summarized the speech, "Teacher Zhou talked about the things that happened in our daily life and we never have such practical lessons before in our village. Is the lesson great? Ms.Zhou, look, there is no movement in the whole meeting room and all the old people and the children are listening carefully. This is a rare situation. I didn’t know that your speech was so great. At first the leaders told me that someone would come to give a speech. I broadcasted the news inappropriately. I hope you don’t mind." Some cadre and villagers insisted that I stay for dinner since they wanted me to talk more.

The old village head took a pen and wrote my phone number on the back of his hand. I ripped a paper from a book and wrote down my number. Many people snatched the paper and the old village head said loudly, "Don’t snatch. I will give the number to all the people who need it."

I wish that I could stay with them more but I didn’t want them to prepare me dinner since that would have made everything more complicated. When I left, it was almost half past 11.

Even though I was very tired, I was very happy.

-Translated by volunteer Xiaoran

Story link:www.toumingyu.org/zhouyonghong/story/6232/

Posted: 12/10/2011 - 0 comment(s) [ Comment ]
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Category: Bio

  Hey! The name is Kevin Mo and I’m kicking it at Los Altos High School as a junior. I love life, and everything it throws at me—happiness, love, sadness, trials—they’re all worth persevering through. I pray that my actions and words would positively impact people, even if it’s just one person, because I want to know that I made a difference in someone’s life. Everything I do shapes the person that I am; I love frolicking in the meadows with friends, playing music, talking to people, and eating out. You can find me sitting on the same piano bench that I’ve had for seven years, in the back of the school trying to learn how to dance, on the courts smashing them birdies, but most importantly, everything I do cannot be complete without my family and friends who I hold dear to. 

I have been exposed to the topic of social justice throughout my life, from praying for a little girl with congenital heart disease to loving on the homeless. However, I wasn’t too thrilled about doing what I did and didn’t really have a heart to serve unconditionally and wholeheartedly. But recently this past summer, I went on a short term mission trip to Belize where I discovered my zeal to genuinely serve others and how much fun little kids are. In a group of 35, our team went to Belize, an underprivileged, poor country. Coming to Belize, I realized how fortunate I was to have the life that I was blessed with. We spent most of the time at the Youth Hostel, but I felt that the most moving part was at the island of San Pedro where we held block parties and a Vacation Bible School for young kids. Though the outside of the island seemed to be just as extravagant as Hawaii, the rural area behind the beauty was the complete opposite, and it really broke my heart because of how little they had yet the kids were enjoying themselves more than I was. The spirit of servitude fell upon me and it gave me the desire to show God’s love to as many people as possible. It broke my heart when I saw how hard and unfair of a life they had, and how social injustice keeps them trapped where they are. At that time I knew I couldn’t do much to break their hopeless cycle, but I still helped and loved for them as much as I could.

When I first read East Villager’s vision and goals, I immediately thought that it would be another opportunity to help the less fortunate children in the world and I knew right away I wanted to help serve. I wish to learn more about social injustice and also discover more talents or ways that I can serve the people around me. I’ve been blessed with so many gifts and opportunities my whole life and it would only be selfish of me to keep them for myself; I believe anyone can make an impact on someone’s life, and that’s exactly what I’m going to do.